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squish123
Topic :   My Youtube Channel

Don't know if you all go on youtube, but if you like to subscribe on my channel and follow all my fun videos I love to have you.

Likes and comments are most appreciative.

Here is my link.

http://youtube.com/c/tomneary


10/19/2017 17:30 PM


squish123
Topic :   Checklist for Starting a Saltwater Aquarium at Home

Don't know what you need. This is a good site to start.

https://www.thespruce.com/starting-a-saltwater-aquarium-checklist-2925686


10/18/2017 12:31 PM


squish123
Re :   Checking in

Good morning. Checking in.


10/17/2017 08:46 AM


squish123


10/15/2017 13:08 PM


squish123
Re :   Checking in

thanks carrie.


10/11/2017 11:57 AM


squish123
Topic :   Aquarium Fish Diseases - How to Spot Them

Fish Illnesses

Just like any pet, fish can get sick too.  Here are some of the more common illnesses, and how to treat them.


Anchor Worms

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Scratching against objects by the affected fish.
    A protuberance of whitish-green threads from the fish's skin.
    Points of attachment are marked by inflammation.

Cause:
Introduced into aquariums by infected fish, young anchor worms are small crustaceans that burrow into the fish’s skin and enter the muscles. Here they begin to develop and release eggs before they die - leaving behind damage which can become infected.

Treatment:
Common methods include physically removing the parasite and cleaning the wound with an antiseptic like iodine. Also common is bathing freshwater fish in a seawater bath (35ppt) for about 5 minutes for multiple days until the parasite falls off.


Body Flukes

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Scratching against objects by the affected fish.
    Layer of mucus covering gills or body.
    Gills moving rapidly.
    Chewed on or eaten-away gills or fins.
    Reddened skin.
    Note: Pale fish with drooping fins, rapid respiration and/or hollow bellies indicate more extensive infestation.

Cause:
Undesirable environmental conditions—including poor water quality, overcrowding, and/or stress by incompatible species--creates conditions that can lead to destructive outbreaks. Flukes (flatworms approximately 1 mm long) are often present in aquariums but remain harmless under ideal conditions. Avoiding stressful conditions is a key to prevention, but once an outbreak occurs, prompt treatment is critical.

Treatment:
Tetra Parasite Guard® with praziquantel is effective but must be carefully administered per directions. One tablet per 10 gallons. Remove activated carbon and repeat after 48 hours; conduct a partial water change between treatments. Secondary infections are also common and can be treated with antibiotics or general cures like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard®.



Gill Flukes

Gill Flukes

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Infected gills and skin.
    Similar to ich, but telltale sign is movement and possibly eye spots, something that is not found in ich. Use magnification lens to observe.
    Once gills are destroyed, fish will die.

Cause:
Undesirable environmental conditions—including poor water quality, overcrowding, and/or stress by incompatible species--creates conditions that can lead to destructive outbreaks. Flukes, which are flatworms usually about 1 mm long, are often present in aquariums but remain harmless under ideal conditions. Avoiding stressful conditions is key to prevention, but once an outbreak occurs, prompt treatment is critical.

Treatment:
Tetra Parasite Guard® with praziquantel is effective but must be carefully administered per directions. One tablet per 10 gallons. Remove activated carbon and repeat after 48 hours; conduct a partial water change between treatments. Secondary infections are also common and can be treated with antibiotics or general cures like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard®.


Clamped Fin

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Fins are folded against the body and not fanned out as they should be.
    Listless behavior.

Cause:
Not indicative of one specific disease. Can be a reflection of various problems, including bad water quality and/or parasites. Important to first determine the specific problem in order to treat fish properly.

Treatment:
First test the aquarium water to review overall water quality and conduct a partial water change to ensure healthy conditions. If the clamped fins are the result of infections, a multipurpose treatment like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard® are the first lines of treatment. Good practice of adding 1 tbs. aquarium salt per gallon will help prevent clamped fins.

*Always remove activated carbon before administering any treatments.


Dropsy

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Bloating.
    Protruding scales.

Cause:
A bacterial infection of the kidneys, which causes fluid accumulation or renal failure. It appears to create problems only in weakened fish. May stem from untidy aquarium conditions.

Treatment:
External treatments are challenging; preventative care with regular water changes, maintaining ideal aquarium chemistry and adding aquarium salt is highly recommended. Antibiotic injections or feed are most effective, but some wide spectrum antibiotics may help like Tetra Fungus Guard®.


Lice
Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms: Red spots on fish indicating an inflammation.

    Fish are aggravated and restless.
    Usually fish will rub skin against aquarium glass or other objects in an effort to remove lice.
    Other telltale signs: Lice have eight legs—and resemble tiny pale crabs. They appear as flat, dark oval dots crawling on fish.
    Lice use suckers to attach to fish. Then they pierce the skin and feed on the host.

Cause:
Usually from fish that were living in an outdoor pond at one time and bringing them into an indoor aquarium. Also, fish lice can be introduced from wild fish that are added to an aquarium. Lice travel from one host fish to another, spreading bacteria and viruses, so once they’re in your aquarium, you must get rid of them.

Treatment:
Common methods include physically removing the parasite and cleaning the wound with an antiseptic like iodine. Also common is bathing freshwater fish in a seawater bath (35ppt) for about 5 minutes for multiple days until the parasite falls off, or using a formalin bath.


Fungus

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Initially, you’ll notice a gray or whitish growth in and on the skin and/or fins.
    Untreated fungus resembles a cottony growth.
    Eventually, as fungus continues to eat away at the fish’s body, the fish will die.

Cause:
Fish who develop fungus are already in a vulnerable state, the result of other serious health problems or attacks, such as parasites, a physical injury or a bacterial infection.

Treatment:
Many bacterial infections are misdiagnosed as fungal, so common medications include both a fungicide and antibiotics. Tetra Fungus Guard® contains malachite green and formalin; treat one tablet per 10 gallons once every 4 days until symptoms are gone. Remove activated carbon and conduct partial water changes in between treatments.


Gill Mites

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    Gasping at the water’s surface.
    Gill covers that are partially open.

Cause:
Fish that are already infested by gill mites are brought into aquariums. The tiny mites stay on the fish’s gills, and attack the fish by feeding on blood and living flesh.

Treatment:
Tetra Parasite Guard® with praziquantel is effective but must be carefully administered per directions. One tablet per 10 gallons. Remove activated carbon and repeat after 48 hours; conduct a partial water change between treatments. Secondary infections are also common and can be treated with antibiotics or general cures like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard®.


Hemorrhagic Septicemia

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    A variety of different symptoms may occur, though some fish exhibit no external symptoms.
    Hemorrhaging of internal organs, skin and muscle.
    Bulging eyes.
    Bloated abdomens.
    Bruised-looking reddish tints to eyes, skin, gills and fins.
    Open sores.
    Abnormal behavior.

Cause:
Infection that is brought into aquariums by fish already infected with a deadly virus called Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV or VHSv).

Treatment:
There is no known cure for this virus. Sometimes treating secondary infections with wide spectrum antibiotics or general use treatments like Lifeguard® will reduce mortality. Add one tablet Lifeguard to each 5 gallons and treat 5 consecutive days. Remove activated carbon and conduct a partial water change in between treatments.


Ick

Physical/Behavioral Signs/Symptoms:

    Spots that resemble grains of salt or white sand on the skin.
    May be slightly-raised.
    Scratching against objects due to irritated skin
    Clamped fins.
    Gasping at the water’s surface.

Cause:
Usually attacks fish that are stressed, which can be caused by factors including rapid temperature and pH fluctuations.
 
Treatment:
Tetra Ick Guard®. Use one tablet per 10 gallons, remove activated carbon and repeat after 24 hours; conduct a partial water change between treatments. Repeat until symptoms clear. Secondary infections are also common and can be treated with antibiotics or general cures like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard®. Consistent temperature and good water quality will help prevent infections, in addition to using aquarium salt.


Ragged Tail Fin

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    A progressive deterioration of the tail and/or fins.
    Fins become frayed or their color may fade.

Cause:
A bacterial infection may cause this tail and fin rot in susceptible fish—those who are bullied or injured by fin-nipping tank mates—especially in aquariums with poor conditions.

Treatment:
First test the aquarium water to review overall water quality and conduct a partial water change to ensure healthy conditions. If the clamped fins are the result of infections, a multipurpose treatment like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard® is the first line of treatment. Good practice of adding 1 tbs. aquarium salt per gallon will help prevent clamped fins.

*Always remove activated carbon before administering any treatments.


Tail, Fin and Mouth Rot

Physical/Behavioral Signs or Symptoms:

    A progressive deterioration of the tail and/or fins.
    Fins become frayed or their color may fade.

Cause:
A bacterial infection may cause tail, fin and mouth rot in susceptible fish—those who are bullied or injured by fin-nipping tank mates—especially in aquariums with poor conditions.

Treatment:
First test the aquarium water to review overall water quality and conduct a partial water change to ensure healthy conditions. If the clamped fins are the result of infections, a multipurpose treatment like Lifeguard® or Fungus Guard® is the first line of treatment. Good practice of adding 1 tbs. aquarium salt per gallon will help prevent clamped fins.

*Always remove activated carbon before administering any treatments.

Note: Please consult a local veterinary doctor to properly diagnose ailments and fine-tune treatments.


10/11/2017 11:46 AM


squish123
Topic :   Let us know

Of any fish emergencies you have. We'll try to help you.


10/11/2017 11:45 AM


squish123
Topic :   Saltwater Fish, Freshwater Dips

By Neale Monks, Ph.D.

Freshwater dips provide a useful method for controlling the spread of external parasites on marine fish, and it is an essential first step when introducing newly purchased marine fish to your home aquarium.

Background
Marine fish are, to a greater or lesser degree, able to tolerate reduced water salinity for extended periods without harm. By contrast, most invertebrates, including those that parasitize marine fish, cannot. The idea behind freshwater dips is to expose newly purchased marine fish to reduced salinity long enough to kill any external parasites they might be carrying without causing the fish itself any serious harm.

Freshwater dips are also useful for washing away unwanted chemicals associated with some marine fish. Some marine fish (e.g., morays, puffers, boxfish and soapfish) exude distasteful or even toxic chemicals when stressed. Dipping washes these away before they can harm the fish or any other livestock.

Method
The size of the container used for the fish’s freshwater dip should be relatively large so that the wastes expelled by the fish do not reach toxic levels too quickly. For small marine fish, such as damsels and gobies, a 2- to 3-gallon bucket might be acceptable, but larger 5-gallon buckets would be more appropriate for larger marine fish, such as angelfish and triggerfish.

The pH and temperature of the freshwater dip should be as close as possible to the pH and temperature of your marine aquarium. Dechlorinated tap water is usually fine, but use a commercial pH buffer to raise the pH to 8.0 to 8.2 if necessary. Use a thermometer to check if the temperature of the fresh water is the same as that in your aquarium — few tropical marine fish tolerate chilling well. If your tap water contains ammonia, use a water conditioner that neutralizes it.

Use an airstone to keep the water agitated and well supplied with oxygen. This is especially important with marine species intolerant of low oxygen levels, such as surgeonfish.

Some aquarists add anti-parasite medications, typically based on copper sulfate and/or formalin, to their freshwater dips. These will certainly make the dip more effective, but remember that some fish are intolerant of copper and formalin, so check beforehand. Antibiotics, such as those based on nitrofurazone, may also be added.

Duration
Marine fish should be dipped in the fresh water for a period of several minutes. The longer the marine fish is dipped in the freshwater, the more effective the treatment will be.

Of course, not all marine fish tolerate freshwater dips equally well, and the aquarist will have to observe the fish closely and remove it, should it display signs of severe stress, such as thrashing about or rolling onto its back.

Marine fish species that naturally swim into brackish or freshwater habitats, such as Arothron puffers and Lutjanus snappers can be dipped for 10 minutes or more without harm, but most reef-dwelling species are best dipped for between two to five minutes.

Post-Dipping
After the freshwater dip of your new marine fish, transfer the fish to a quarantine tank. Freshwater dips do not eliminate all parasites, and quarantining gives you the chance to treat any parasites or disease-causing organisms that remain.

If you don’t have a quarantine tank, dipping will at least reduce the chances of introducing parasites, such as marine ich. So dipping is a valuable if not flawless first step before adding newly purchased fish to your system. Aquarists with fish-only marine systems will find this approach relatively satisfactory because most fish tolerate the use of anti-parasite medications reasonably well. Consequently, if parasites do appear on your marine fish, a suitable medication can be used safely.

Aquarists with FOWLR and reef tanks should consider setting up a quarantine tank simply because invertebrates do not tolerate anti-parasite medications well. Should a parasite outbreak occur, all the marine fish will need to be treated in a hospital tank away from the invertebrates. Since a quarantine tank for a single newly-purchased marine tank will be smaller and much less expensive to set up than a hospital tank that can house all of your marine fish, quarantining new livestock remains by far the most sensible and cost-effective approach.

Invertebrates
Can you dip invertebrates? On the whole, no, because these animals (unlike most fish) have little ability to adjust their bodies in reaction to changes in salinity. There are some euryhaline (i.e., brackish-tolerant) marine invertebrates in the trade that might be dipped, but identifying them is difficult, and consequently, dipping invertebrates is not recommended.

On the other hand, dipping invertebrates into saltwater baths containing certain medications is possible. One common method for dipping corals involves 10-minute dips into saltwater containing 5 to 10 drops of iodine (specifically, Lugol’s) per gallon of water. This does a good job of shifting the various pathogens that sometimes afflict corals.


10/11/2017 11:35 AM


squish123
Topic :   What equimpment do you need?

What equipment do you need to start a saltwater aquari?


10/11/2017 11:33 AM


squish123
Topic :   Aquarium Plants

Can the plants in your tank kill your fish if they take over the tank?


10/11/2017 11:32 AM


squish123
Topic :   Fish Breeding

I had success with breeding. How about you?


10/11/2017 11:31 AM


squish123
Topic :   Going on Vacation - Your Aquarium and Fish

 Good tips.

You've been working hard all year long and it's finally time for that well deserved vacation. Ah, just to think about it gives me the vacation fever. The time is drawing near and you suddenly realize - what the heck am I going to do about the fish? Who's going to feed the fish? What do I need to do to get my fish tank ready before I leave on my trip? There are several things to keep in mind and we'll try to help you get things in order before you leave so you can have a stress free and relaxing vacation not worrying about your fish and your aquarium!

What about feeding the fish?
Fish can go for several weeks without food. Some believe they can go for 3 or more weeks even. Yes, this is true believe it or not and your fish will be fine while you're away. Your tank may even look cleaner when you get home from vacation since there should be less wastes in the water from the lack of fish food entering the aquarium and less wastes being produced from fish eating that fish food.

If you just can't stand the thought of your fish not eating for the amount of time you'll be gone, invest in an automatic fish feeder. These fish food dispensers are relatively inexpensive and they can actually be put into full time use, even when you are at home. You can fill them with a mix of tropical fish flakes (or other flake or pellet foods, depending on the fish you keep) and it should be several weeks before you need to refill the food container. Most are fully adjustable (you can release as little or as much food as allowed), operate on batteries and will easily attach to the top of the tank.

Another option is to use one of those plastic pill boxes that are composed of small boxes corresponding to the day of the week. You put in the amount of food that day's container that you'd like for your friend, family member or neighbor to give to your fish and then you don't have to worry about them overfeeding and polluting the aquarium water.

Try to do a partial water change right before you leave for vacation. This accomplishes a couple of things. The fish will get some good clean water, which should lower their stress levels and should help keep them healthy in your absence. This also gets the water level topped off so you may not have to worry about a low water level in the tank, but it depends on the rate of evaporation of course.

Rinse out the aquarium filter media, or replace half of it. A clogged filter shouldn't pose a problem since many filters (especially power filters) have an alternate path for the water to return to the tank should the filter become clogged.

You may be concerned about what to do with the aquarium lighting while you're gone. Should I leave it on or leave it off? There is a very simple solution here... The aquarium lighting can easily be turned on and off automatically using an aquarium light timer. If you're keeping freshwater plants or saltwater corals in a reef tank or macro algae in your refugium, you really should have a light timer anyway so that your plants and corals receive adequate amounts of aquarium light.

We try to go on vacation at least once a year (if we're lucky) and we have a neighbor come over several times a day to let our dog out. They have a dog too and we do this favor for each other when we go out of town. It really is extremely beneficial to have a good neighbor you can trust. While they are letting the dog out, I just ask them to check out the aquariums to make sure nothing is leaking and that nothing looks out of the ordinary. I have asked them to rinse out a protein skimmer collection cup before while I was away. If you've never seen a full cup of skimmer gunk, it can be very dark colored, yucky and smelly. They did it for me. I guess I really do have some good neighbors.

Make sure you give the fish sitter a phone number to reach you at while on vacation just in case of an emergency with your fish or tank. A leak could develop, the heater could stick in the on position leading to a rise in temperature, the automatic water top off system could stick in the on position, etc. Remember Murphy's law here - "Whatever can go wrong, will go wrong at the worst possible time". Write down a small list of tasks you'd like for them to do. Keep it short and don't put anything that is not absolutely essential. Here is a sample list of things you could ask your fish sitter to take care of:

* Feed the fish daily from that day's slot in the pill box - just that amount and no more please.
* Look at the temperature of the tank and if it's above 84 degrees F, call me.
* Quickly look around the base of the tank and on the floor in the immediate vicinity and inspect for leaking tank water.
* Dump out the contents of the protein skimmer collection cup (saltwater tanks only).
* Thank you for doing this for me while I'm on vacation - I really appreciate it!

Invite the fish sitter over a day or two before you leave and walk them through your list. Show them exactly how to do the various tasks. Don't expect them to know what a protein skimmer collection is or looks like! Show them exactly how to put the food in the water and exactly how to empty the collection cup, etc.

What if I don't have someone to come over?
If you're only going to be away for a week, your fish should be fine without food as mentioned above. If you have a saltwater aquarium you may need to adjust the skimmer collection cup so that it doesn't collect as much since you won't be there to empty it. If you're going to be away for a longer period of time, than say two weeks, you will be really risking it not having someone come over. This is from a water evaporation and feeding standpoint. Although you're fish should be ok from a food standpoint, your tank water may not be in the best shape after two weeks without your care.

So, plan ahead, take proper pre-cautions and show the fish sitter exactly what needs to be done and rest easy knowing that your fish will be fine. Have fun on vacation and we'll see you when you get back!


10/11/2017 11:24 AM


squish123
Topic :   Overfeeding your fish

This article is particularly aimed at people new to the hobby where overfeeding tends to be more common, and gives a guide to feeding the general community fish that we tend to start with.

It is not that we intentionally mean to 'overfeed' but I think we've all walked past our aquariums especially in the earlier days seen the fish swim up, so we thought we?d add a pinch of food just to make sure.
Fish in the aquarium environment is like us living permanently in a hotel, after a little while of enjoying the luxury of having lovely meals put in front of you, one would have to 'cut back a bit' or you would be gaining weight. A fishes appetite is much bigger than it's stomach, your fish will continue eating long after they are full and the food simply passes through polluting the water.
Human beings are hot-blooded, meaning we have to get energy in form of food in order to maintain and stabilize our temperature. Fish are cold blooded, their temperature is controlled by the environment they're in. The metabolism of fish is controlled by their surrounding temperature. The lower the water temperature, the lower their digestive time. Generally speaking, the digestive time for fish kept in 74-78 degrees is about 16-24 hours if you try to remember this you won't go far wrong.
Consequences of overfeeding :oops:

High ammonia and nitrites - The protein in uneaten food and fish waste is broken down into ammonia and nitrites, which are toxic to fish and we would need to increase water changes to keep these levels low.

Low oxygen levels - When organic material (uneaten food and fish waste) decays, it is an aerobic process, meaning it uses oxygen and produces carbon dioxide. This means there is less dissolved oxygen in the tank for the fish. Fish will come to the surface gasping for air, an airstone may have to be added to the tank.

Low pH levels - Just as the breakdown of organic material lowers the oxygen level, it also lowers the pH of the water because acids are produced during the process. Since each species of fish has an ideal pH range we should aim to keep them in the correct conditions.

Fin rot - Fin rot is a condition in which the fins can develop an untidy, ragged appearance. It most often occurs when fish are stressed and water quality is poor, which is a common result of overfeeding.

The dreaded Algae - Algae growth is one of the most common problems seen in aquariums. The number one cause is overfeeding, algae will thrive in any aquarium where plenty of excess nutrients are available.

Planaria (flatworms) - Planaria are small white or tan worms that are good indicators that water quality is not optimal. They are most often found in tanks where overfeeding has occurred. Although generally considered harmless, they will eat fish eggs and do not look very nice, cut back on feeding, give the tank a good clean not forgetting to siphon the gravel (I hate these).

Clogged filters - Filter systems are designed to remove the normal amount of waste materials and breakdown products from the water. Uneaten food and waste materials will collect on the filter pads/sponges and clog the filters and reduce their efficacy. If your pads are saturated in brown slimy gunk in a couple of weeks, then you are overfeeding.

A Fish Feeding Routine

Feed on a schedule - Most tank inhabitants will do well if fed twice daily. If possible, more frequent and smaller feedings are preferred. In the wild, most fish do not eat large meals like we do, but are foraging and grazing throughout the day, so simply divide the daily amount into smaller portions.

There are lots of live/frozen foods available from your LFS, these should be given only as a treat no more than a couple of times a week.

How Much Then :book: - The best way to determine how much to feed your fish is to watch them while they feed. Add small amounts of food at a time, just 2-3 flakes. If all the food has been eaten within several minutes, feed a small amount more. The general rule of thumb is to only feed them as much as they can eat within 2-3 minutes. Anything not eaten by then, will likely never be eaten and really should be removed as it will start to break down.

If you think you have put too much food in the tank, perform a partial water change by siphoning 25% of the water from the bottom of the tank. Use the siphon to pick up as much debris/food from the substrate as possible.

Make sure all the fish are feeding and swimming normally, it's a great time to look for anything that may be cause for concern

Research the feeding requirements of the different fish you keep - Different fish require different foods. There are top feeders (upturned mouth), mid-water feeders, and bottom feeders (mouth on the underside). Hence, floating foods, slow sinking foods, and rapidly sinking foods, something for everyone.

Fish are creatures of habit and may take time to identify a new food as something that can be eaten, so just add a little until they get used of it.

Bottom feeders - Scavenger fish (catfish and loaches) and invertebrates can assist in 'cleaning up' some of the uneaten food that falls to the bottom of the tank. They can be helpful in removing food that falls to inaccessible areas of the tank that may be difficult to siphon or clean, but beware foul conditions/rotting food on the substrate will not keep these fish in good condition they need a good, clean environment also.

Tip...and perhaps the most important one!
As a general rule a fishes stomach is about the same size as it's eye so as you can see when looking at your fish they don't need much food!

Remember overfeeding is the major cause of fish loss.


10/11/2017 11:19 AM


squish123
Topic :   What tank size?

What size tank would be good for a newbie?


10/11/2017 11:17 AM


squish123
Topic :   Set up my Tank

I have my tank set up in my basement (mancave). It doesn't get to hot or too cold there so do I need to keep my tank heater on a certain temp?


10/11/2017 11:16 AM


squish123
Topic :   Marine Angelfish

Image result for marine angelfish


Marine Angelfish

Group: Saltwater
Size: Small to Large
Temperament: Semi-Aggressive
Aquarium size: Large
Swimming Region(s):Mid-Range
Water Conditions:Warm Saltwater, Neutral to Slightly Alkaline pH Range
Suitable Tank Mates:Non-Aggressive Species of Similar Size: Butterflyfish, Gobies, Blennies, Tangs, Triggerfish, and Anthias
Difficulty Of Care:Daily

General Description
Also known as marine angelfish, saltwater angelfish are found primarily in tropical waters and shallow reefs. Most species are found in the Western Pacific Ocean, though a few can be found in the Atlantic and the Eastern Pacific/Indian Oceans. All marine angelfish belong to the family Pomacanthidae but there are nine different genera, including the following:

Apolemichthys
Centropyge
Chaetodontoplus
Genicanthus
Holacanthus
Paracentropyge
Pomacanthus
Pygoplites
Sumireyakko

Different saltwater angelfish species exhibit different temperaments but most of them are fairly peaceful while young, though they tend to develop a territorial streak as they mature. Marine angelfish range in size from as small as 4 inches to as large as 24 inches. Some angelfish can get along with non-aggressive species of similar size like butterflyfish, gobies, blennies, tangs, triggerfish, and anthias.

Also known as marine angelfish, saltwater angelfish are found primarily in tropical waters and shallow reefs.

Origins
Marine angelfish can be found throughout the shallow reefs and tropical regions of the Indian, Atlantic, and Western Pacific Oceans.

Color
Marine angelfish are known for their laterally compressed bodies and their bright colorations. These fish come in an endless array of color combinations including various shades of green, blue, yellow, purple, pink, orange, brown, black, gray, and white. Many angelfish species exhibit stripes, spots, or bars, often with colored fins.

Maintenance and Care
Marine angelfish are known for their laterally compressed bodies and their bright colorations.Most saltwater angelfish are hardy in the home aquarium but it can be difficult to acclimate them to life in captivity if they were wild-caught. It is also important to note that adult angelfish can be very destructive to reef habitats so you may want to limit decorations to live rock rather than corals and other delicate invertebrates. As for the water conditions angelfish prefer, a slightly alkaline pH range between 8.1 and 8.4 is ideal with moderate hardness between 8 and 12 dKH.

Marine angelfish are known for their laterally compressed bodies and their bright colorations.

Feeding
Most saltwater angelfish feed primarily on sponges and tunicates – this is what makes them difficult to keep in the home aquarium. Some species feed on plankton or algae. In the home aquarium, it is best to feed angelfish a wide variety of foods to entice them to eat.

Breeding Info
Most angelfish change drastically in color as they approach sexual maturity. Juveniles and females of different species tend to have more drab coloration while males are brightly colored. It is also interesting to note that it is possible for female angelfish to turn into a male if the dominant male from a harem is removed. Angelfish are pelagic spawners, releasing large quantities of buoyant eggs into the water which then float with the currents until hatching.

Aquarium Varieties
There are approximately 87 species of saltwater angelfish divided among 9 genera and not all of them are popular in the aquarium hobby. Some of the most popular species of marine angelfish for the aquarium trade include the following:

Flame Angelfish (Centropyge loricula)
Blue-Striped Angelfish (Chaetodontoplus septenrionalis)
Keyhole Angelfish (Centropyge tibicen)
Lamarck’s Angelfish (Genicanthus Lamarck)
Queen Angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris)
Emperor Angelfish (Pomacanthus imperator)
Blue Angelfish (Holacanthus bermudensis)
Regal Angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus)
French Angelfish (Pomacanthus paru)
Photo credit: Mikhail Levit/Bigstock; mirecca/Bigstock

Tagged as: angel fish, Angelfish, aquarium, Aquarium fish, blue angelfish, emperor angelfish, marine angelfish, queen angelfish, regal angelfish, saltwater, saltwater angelfish, saltwater fish.





10/11/2017 10:37 AM


Ccalgurl
Re :   Checking in

squish get well soon  their  coming to fix my dryer  this morning  carrie is checking for october


10/11/2017 10:30 AM


squish123
Re :   Checking in

I been recovering from a bad cold. I still feel a bit sick and weak. I hope as each day goes, I'll get better.


10/11/2017 09:52 AM


squish123
Topic :   Bio Fish Tanks

Anyone have a Bio Fish Tank. I heard these tanks are easier to maintain then a reg tank?


10/11/2017 09:51 AM

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