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Title: Dog Info
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(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:13 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:17 PM)

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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:19 PM)


The Peruvian Inca Orchid (aka Peruvian Hairless) is believed to have been around since A.D. 750 when the breed appeared in settlements of Peru.

The Inca Indians valued the hairless dogs, which were kept in the homes of nobility, among decorative Orchids, as both pets and bed warmers!

Despite this seemingly pampered background, the Peruvian Inca Orchid is a sight hound with fast legs, keen eyesight and hearing, and a high activity level, much like a
Greyhound, and should be exercised daily.

This dog is also very loyal to and affectionate his family and is known to be a good guard dog. He is always wary of strangers and alert, and particularly does not like being patted on the head by someone new to him. This means the breed requires socialization with pets and people early and often.

His skin, like any person's, needs to be washed periodically, and protected from extreme weather with dog-friendly sunscreen and perhaps a coat or jacket. As in ancient times, the living quarters of the Peruvian Inca Orchid should be inside the house, not a problem for most modern pet owners.

This breed’s size can vary depending on the dog; they can either be small, medium, or large. There is no general size.

Overall, this dog is slender and elegant, showing off his speed and strength. The majority of this breed is hairless and the minority has a very short coat.

This dog breed is not recommended for beginners



(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/25/2018 9:38 AM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:21 PM)


Dog Alarm For Narcoleptics
Jan 11, 2013 8:47:00 AM by Allison Espiritu

Have you caught yourself dozing off when riding the bus, and heaving that sigh of relief when you wake up just in the nick of time to make it to your stop? This probably happens to plenty of us, but imagine instantly falling asleep once you hit that seat and falling into a deep slumber for the next sixteen hours. You wake up disoriented and not sure where you even started. Not possible? Unfortunately, for some it's a battle they deal with every day of their lives.

Narcolepsy, affecting an estimated 200,000 Americans, (though only 50,000 have actually been diagnosed) puts a damper on both the social and work lives of those hit by this condition. Even with medication, narcoleptics still find themselves fighting to stay awake during the most simple tasks.

However, human's best friend once again comes to the rescue. Most recently Dr. Olivier Le Bon from Tivoli Hospital in La Louviere and his team teamed up with the animal charity Coeur a Coeur, to put the alarm-clock dog into play.

First
training a pooch to wake up their narcoleptic masters in the morning at the sound of an alarm clock, they progressively learn to wake their sleepy friends at the sound of a mobile phone ringing. Over time, these cunning canines can wake their dozing patients when necessary at every metro, tram, or bus station. Missing a stop has definitely become a thing of the past.

Whether nipping them at the ankles, nudging them with their muzzle, or giving a little yelp, trained dogs have become a narcoleptic's reliable companion. Falling asleep is no longer a dreaded worry; they now can live close to normal independent lives as they travel around the city with ease, meet up with friends, and make it to work on time, alongside a buddy who'll always be there to give them that wake-up-call.

Dr. Le Bon's solution has spread around the narcoleptic community, and he now has a following of patients ready to jump on the alarm-clock dog band wagon.

"I have met several other patients with sleep disorders who are interested in our success, and the charity Coeur a Coeur has agreed to do the training," he said.

Here's to our furry friends giving us a second chance on life!



(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/24/2018 1:38 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:26 PM)


Tick Removal:


Spring is here and the ticks will soon be showing their heads.  Here is a good way to get them off you, your children or your pets. Give it a try

Please forward to anyone with children, hunters or dogs or anyone who even steps outside in summer

A School Nurse has written the info below--good enough to share--and it really works!


"I had a pediatrician tell me what she believes is the best way to remove a tick. This is great because it works in those places where it's sometimes difficult to get to with tweezers: between toes, in the middle of a head full of dark hair, etc


Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and swab it for a few seconds (15-20); the tick will come out on its own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.  This technique has worked every time I've used it (and that was frequently), and it's much less traumatic for the patient and easier for me

Unless someone is allergic to soap, I can't see that this would be damaging in any way. I even had my doctor's wife call me for advice because she had one stuck to her back and she couldn't reach it with tweezers. She used this method and immediately called me back to say, "It worked!"



(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/24/2018 1:40 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:28 PM)





~~~~~ THANKSGIVING SAFETY ~~~~~

(Author Unknown)

It's Thanksgiving morning and the turkey is just about cooked to perfection, the cornbread dressing is finished and repeatedly sampled by those camped out in the kitchen. The family pet knows that there will be a feast today.

You look down into those adoring eyes of your pet and say, "Hey, why not?" and slip Fluffy a slab of turkey, skin and fat.

Later, Uncle Dee is also taken by Fluffy's unquenchable appetite as he repeatedly feeds Fluffy crackers coated with ham spread. Finally, not wishing to throw away the food the kids didn't finish, Fluffy's food bowl is filled with a liberal sampling of the day's menu, including the pumpkin pie.

Now, a few hours after the last cup of coffee has been served, Aunt Karen rushes in to inform you that Fluffy just threw up all over the living room carpet. You quickly rush Fluffy outside and clean up the mess.

Soon, the kids report that Fluffy is retching, walking with an arched back, depressed and passing bloody stool. Upon investigation it's clear that Fluffy is ill and in need of care.


You call your pet's doctor, and he or she explains that Fluffy is suffering from "dietary indiscretion," a polite way of suggesting your pet ate too much rich food. Because of the potential for serious consequences to this, you are advised to have Fluffy examined as an emergency patient.

At the veterinary hospital, a thorough examination, possibly X-rays and laboratory tests are performed to determine the extent of Fluffy's illness. Your veterinarian informs you that Fluffy has acute gastritis, a rapidly-forming inflammation of the lining of the stomach.

While usually not deadly, this condition can quickly lead to pancreatitis, a deadly inflammation of the pancreas.

For Fluffy, this Thanksgiving night will be spent in the veterinary hospital, possibly hooked up to IV fluids and antibiotics, only having ice cubes to lick on for supper and the prospect of a bland diet as the only food for the next few days. If you are like many of us, you will probably share some of your Thanksgiving meal with your pet, despite reading about Fluffy's situation.

The key to avoid spending Thanksgiving night at your pet doctor's office with a sick pet is moderation. Recognize that your pet's GI system is sensitive and can not handle lots of rich, fatty or spicy food.

Adding a teaspoon of white turkey meat or broth to your pet's food should allow you to share the "Thanksgiving experience" with your pet.









(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/24/2018 2:14 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:30 PM)

Don't Leave Your Dog in a Parked Car - EVER!


It’s probably obvious to most of us that dogs shouldn’t be left in 90 degree heat, but what about on a regular warm day, when it’s cool in the shade?

You’ll crack the windows for Fido and everything will be fine … there’s a breeze coming in, you’re not parked in direct sun. No problem, right?

WRONG! A car traps the heat of the sun like a greenhouse, even when parked in the shade, even with the windows cracked.

A recent study illustrates some scary numbers; the inside temperature of a car parked in the shade with two windows cracked at noon on an 88 degree day was 105 degrees! A study from Stanford University found that even on a cool day—72 degrees—a car’s internal temperature will climb to a boiling 116 degrees within an hour.

Cracking the windows did nothing to slow the heat-up. That’s eye opening stuff.

I’m an absolute terrorist when it comes to dogs in locked cars.I
was in a truck parked in direct sun, and the dog looked very uncomfortable.

I watched for a few minutes just to make sure that the owner wasn’t doing an in-and-out trip to the store (still very unsafe), and then I called the non-emergency police number. The grocery store made an announcement about the dog in the car, and I watched people look around tsk-tsking, trying to identify the idiot.

In the meantime I wrote a note telling the owner of the car that the police were on the way, and that he had put his dog in a very dangerous situation. Over twenty minutes had passed by this point and I was unhinged by the dog’s obvious discomfort. It was hot out, but I wasn’t ready to commit an act of vigilante justice and break the windows, particularly because the police were on the way.

The car’s owner finally emerged over a half hour after I’d initially spotted the dog. I made my way over to him, not sure of how I could convey my anger without getting beat up or shot, but he grabbed the note off his windshield and sped off before I reached him.

The police car pulled in the other entry way as the truck exited, and even though I was able to give the
number and his general direction, nothing could be done. Score one for the idiot.

http://mydogiscool.com/ (if the link doesn't work copy and paste it) is doing a great job raising awareness about the dangers of leaving dogs in cars. I’ve used their flyers on cars around town on days when the risk of overheating wasn’t as great.

On hot days I skip the flyer and go right to the non-emergency police number. In my area they understand the danger of leaving a dog locked in the car, and will break in and ticket if necessary. I’ll borrow a line from the government:
if you see something, say something. You might be that dog’s only advocate.



(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/24/2018 1:56 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:33 PM)


Does A Dog Need Protection From The Sun?

(Author Unknown)


Think sun protection is just for humans? Think again. Your dog needs a safe haven from those harsh ultraviolet rays, too. Here are seven pointers to help Spot enjoy the great outdoors in summer, without feeling the burn.

1. Don't shave your long-coated dog for the summer. When you shave your dog's coat, it exposes his skin to sun damage. The hair coat acts as a protective barrier against the sun's ultraviolet rays, and shaved skin is much more vulnerable to sunburn. Instead, thin out your K9's coat using a Furminator or an undercoat rake, so Spot carries a lighter load in the heat.

Think of this as the difference between a cotton T-shirt and a wool sweater!

2. Dogs experiencing hair loss need special treatment. "Dogs most at risk for sunburn include dogs who are experiencing hair loss due to health reasons, such as allergies or hormonal changes," explains Dr. Heather Peikes, board-certified staff dermatologist at New York City Veterinary Specialists. "Chemotherapy can also thin out a dog's coat."

3.
Your geographic location
determines how much protection you'll need to give your dog, she adds: "On the East Coast, we worry less about sun-induced melanomas and skin changes, but in Colorado, California, and Australia it's much more of a concern." Also consider your dog's breed. A hairless Chinese Crested, for instance, will need extra sun protection.

4. Protect serious sun bathers. Some dogs are serious sunbathers, and could happily fry themselves for hours. But don't let them sizzle!

Dogs that worship the sun while lying on their backs risk developing tumors on the inguinal area, that vulnerable stretch of skin where the belly and hind legs meet; this area is unprotected by hair even on furry breeds. When you notice your sun-worshipping Spot panting, it's time to bring him back indoors before he sustains a sunburn. Please take extra precaution if your dog's snout is pink. Light-skinned dogs, like light-skinned people, are more prone to sun irritation.

Protect your pup's inguinal area, and her snout if it's on the pink side.


5. How to help a sunburned dogIf Spot did sustain a sunburn, give him a soothing bath with cool water and a gentle, soap-free product such as TheraNeem Pet Shampoo. Before lathering up, add 5 drops of Neem Oil to the shampoo in your palm, then work the mixture through your dog's fur, down to the skin. Wait a few minutes before rinsing with cool water. Non-toxic Neem works quickly and safely to heal heat as well as chemical burns. (Neem products for pets are available here.)

6. Select the proper sunscreen. For an ounce of prevention, use sunscreen on Spot. "Select a sunscreen that's safe for human babies," Dr. Peikes advises. Two excellent brands are Aubrey Organics Green Tea Sunblock for Children with SPF 25 and Jason Kids' Block with SPF 46. There's also an all-natural balm designed to prevent and soothe doggie sunburn:
The Natural Dog Snout Soother (SPF 10), which contains shea butter, kukui nut oil, and vitamin E.

7. Watch out for zinc oxide. Whatever sunscreen you select, make sure it contains no zinc oxide, which is toxic to pets. "Try the product out on one small area of your dog's skin before spreading it further," recommends Dr. Peikes. If you see no adverse reaction, go ahead and apply the sunscreen to your dog's inguinal area (see above) and snout. These are the key points; there's no need to coat your entire dog with sunscreen.

8. Consider protective clothing in some situations. If your dog had to be shaved for a surgical procedure, protect that area from the sun using a T-shirt that you customize to fit him. If you anticipate spending hours out in the sun with Spot - say, while out sailing or hiking - investigate performance sun protective dog clothing such as
RashGuard.

 




(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/24/2018 2:09 PM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:35 PM)


Springtime Safety Tips for Dogs
http://www.dogster.com/dog-health-care/ ... s-for-dogs

by
Helen Fazio


Unless you live in a very mild or tropical zone, making the transition from spring to summer requires some adjustments for dogs and owners alike. Just as winter ice doesn't become summer grass overnight, changeable conditions require flexibility. Here are some things to take into consideration now that spring has sprung:

Spring Outer Wear: If your dog wears a coat in winter, unless the heat transition is very dramatic, you may want him to wear a lighter sweater or doggy tee walking in the chilly sun. Coat-donning dogs are accustomed to having their body temperatures managed, and they get chilly easily.

Paw Care: Conscious spring paw care is essential. Roadside banks of icy snow have been repeatedly inundated with salt and other snow melting chemicals. The puddles from these glaciers are toxic and harsh for the pads.

Remember to wash your dog's feet with soap after every walk and beware of thirsty dogs who want to lap up snow melt water. As the sun warms the roads, dogs will again get thirsty on walks, so carry a water bottle and travel bowl to prevent sipping roadside sludge.

Shedding: Many dogs shed in spring. Shedding is a natural transition, but the dry, winter coat can cause mats and tangles as it falls out, especially if your dog wears a coat or a sweater outside.

Always remember to take your dog's warm clothes off inside after every walk. Gentle, regular brushing in spring helps restore oils to the new coat, stimulates the skin and prevents the dreaded dreads of an unkempt coat. Your vet may approve canine Omega 3 oil capsules to assist this transitional period for the coat.

Exercise: Warmer weather means we all feel friskier. It is normal for dogs to store fat in winter, but a heavier dog needs to begin spring exercise gently. Just as you may want to ease back into an outdoor exercise routine, your companion dog also needs to take it slowly at first. Increase walks and runs in the park steadily, but gradually.

Allergies: Dogs get springtime allergies too. As is the case for humans, dogs can become allergic over time, so do not be surprised if your dog's reactions to springtime allergens change from puppy to adult. Pollen from the first flowering trees, dandelions and tulips, dust, mold and even insects can cause allergic reactions.

Symptoms include itching, coughing, sneezing, flaky skin or an oily-feeling coat. Never use human allergy medicines for dogs on your own initiative. Canine allergy medicines are effective; your vet can prescribe the safest dose.

Toxic Plants and Mulch: Spring bulb plants pushing out of the ground often attract dogs. It's not that dogs just want to ruin the landscaping. Squirrels and rodents are also attracted to spring bulbs and an inquisitive dog might be hot on the trail.

But be aware. Many spring bulbs fall into the allium family, and onions (allium) are toxic to dogs. Furthermore, cocoa mulch, often used as bedding mulch for park side flower beds, is very attractive to, but highly toxic to dogs. Keep your dog out of the flower beds and nobody will get hurt.

Lawn Chemicals: In the spring, your dog will be able finally to run on grass, not frozen snow or dead thatch. Please pay attention to where you let your dog run. Spring lawn care often combines herbicide and pesticide treatments to kill insect larva, ticks, fleas, "critters," and seed-sprouting weeds.

Nitrogen-based fertilizers, blood meal, milorganite, rose boosters and Japanese beetle inhibitors, grub killers, herbicides, insecticides (especially those with organophosphates), rodenticides, acid fertilizer for holly and azalea and slug and snail baits do not belong on dogs' paws. While these chemical washes might produce a green lawn, they also produce a toxic lawn for dogs. So, walk your dog in the safe scrubby grass in spring and keep an eye out for the "pesticide treated" signs in the formal lawns. Pesticides, herbicides and dogs don't go together.

By thinking ahead, dog owners can head off problems and help their dogs get the most out of getting out and about in spring.

About the Author: Helen Fazio and her dog Raja blog on pet travel and related topics at www.traveldogbooks.com. In their first book, "The Journey of the Shih Tzu," Raja tells the wolf to woof story of the development of this amazing breed. They are working on forthcoming titles.



(Message edited by Goldenmom On 02/25/2018 9:39 AM)
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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:37 PM)


by Dr. Donna Spector
http://www.halopets.com/freekibble/donna-spector12.php




With flu season in full swing, Americans are concerned about the health of their pets. Although human flu doesn't tend to infect dogs, there is a canine influenza virus that all dog owners should know about.

 

Dog Flu: H3N8

The dog flu virus (Influenza A subtype H3N8) was discovered in 2004 in racing Greyhounds in Florida. The virus is highly contagious between dogs but there is no evidence it can be transmitted from dogs to humans or other species. Although the virus has only been documented in 34 states, it is likely present throughout the U.S. and is considered endemic in Florida, New York, Pennsylvania and Colorado.


 

Dog Flu is highly contagious and easily spread

Almost 100% of dogs will be infected after exposure to this new virus. Within 2 to 4 days, 80% will develop signs of illness and the other 20% of dogs will remain asymptomatic, although they are still capable of spreading the virus. In all cases, dogs are most contagious before they start showing signs. Similar to human flu viruses, this virus is spread by respiratory secretions and readily contaminates food and water bowls, collars, leashes and bedding. The virus can stay alive on most surfaces for 48 hours, on clothing for 24 hours and hands for 12 hours but is easily killed by common disinfectants (bleach, ammonium compounds).


 

What are the signs of dog flu?

Like other flu viruses, this virus causes acute respiratory infection in dogs. Most dogs develop mild respiratory infection characterized by a moist or dry cough that lasts 2 to 3 weeks despite treatment, cloudy or green nasal discharge and a low-grade fever. More severe infections are possible with pneumonia and high fever. Death has been reported in 1 to 5% of dogs who are severely affected. Unlike other flu viruses, canine influenza is not seasonal and occurs year round. Dogs with canine influenza are often misdiagnosed with kennel cough (Bordatella/parainfluenza) as the signs are usually identical. For this reason, canine influenza cannot be diagnosed only on clinical signs. The most common test used for diagnosis is a blood test which identifies antibodies to the virus as early as 7 days after symptoms start. In order to confirm infection, your veterinarian will need to take another blood sample about 2 weeks later. Other tests are available and your veterinarian may recommend a different sample from your dog.


 

What is the treatment for dog flu?

Similar to all viral infections, the treatment for canine influenza is supportive. Secondary bacterial infections are common and many dogs require broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy to fully resolve their signs. Most previously healthy dogs will mount an immune response and recover within 2 to 3 weeks.


 

How can you lessen your dog's risk of getting the flu?

Keep your dog's immune system as healthy as possible during the winter season (and year-round) with a healthful natural diet. One that contains no artificial colors, chemicals or synthetic ingredients and therefore minimize your dog's exposure to potentially harmful substances.  Try to limit your dog's contact with unknown dogs and certainly avoid dogs that are showing obvious signs of respiratory illness.


 

What to do if your dog starts showing signs (like coughing, sneezing, runny nose)

 

  • Keep your dog at home, away from other dogs and dog owners. Your dog should not participate in communal dog activities or be boarded/groomed. In fact, they should be isolated from other dogs for 2 weeks to prevent spread of disease.
  • Wash your hands frequently and change your clothes before seeing another dog to reduce the risk of spread. Better yet, don't visit with other dogs while your dog is sick.
  • Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. There is no cure for the flu but your veterinarian can test for flu and offer supportive treatment.
  • Disinfect surfaces of your home/car that your dog has had contact with before you let other dogs into your home.


Is there a vaccine for dog flu?

Recently, the USDA approved the first canine influenza vaccine. The vaccine may not completely prevent infection but vaccinated dogs will develop less severe illness and are less likely to spread the virus to other dogs. The vaccine is not recommended for every dog—only those with an "at-risk" lifestyle. This includes dogs that are boarded or kenneled frequently, go to the groomer routinely, are housed with other dogs, or have frequent dog contact (dog park, doggy daycare, etc). Ask your veterinarian if the canine flu vaccine is right for your dog.


 

If your dog develops a cough or any other respiratory problem, see your veterinarian immediately for an appropriate course of treatment. You can learn more about dog flu at
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/canine/.

 

Donna Spector, DVM, DACVIM
, is a renowned, board-certified Veterinary Internal Medicine Specialist, an active AVMA and AVHMA member, and leading speaker and writer on pet health and nutrition. She is widely recognized for her role as consulting veterinarian to HALO, Purely for Pets and her TV appearances with Halo co-owner Ellen DeGeneres. Dr. Donna performs medical, nutrition and weight loss consultations for dogs and cats through her web-based veterinary consulting service,

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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:39 PM)


Many holiday foods can be dangerous for your dog. There is no need to forego your favorite holiday goodies, just be careful what your dog is given….or tries to steal! Be particularly attentive to the following food hazards:

 

  • Avoid chocolate. Especially dark or baking chocolate, but all chocolate should be avoided. There are toxins present in chocolate which can cause problems ranging from mild stomach upset to seizures and death. Keep all chocolate out of your dog's reach.
  • Avoid alcohol. Many dogs are attracted to the sweet drinks made during the holiday, especially those containing egg nog. Clean up all glasses and don't leave bottles on the counter without tops. Dogs can die after a single bout of alcohol consumption.
  • Avoid rich fatty foods. These foods can cause your dog mild stomach irritation to a severe condition known as pancreatitis, which often requires hospitalization and can be fatal.
  • Uncooked dough. Dough can expand and produce gas in the stomach which can cause bloat, severe pain and possible rupture of the digestive system. If you are leaving dough out to rise, keep your dog out of that room.
  • Fruits and nuts. Avoid grapes, raisins and macadamia nuts as they can cause problems ranging from digestive upset to organ failure and death.
  • Sugar-free candies. Many sugar-free gums, candies, and even baked goods contain xylitol as a sugar substitute. Xylitol in relatively small amounts can cause life-threatening low blood sugar and liver failure in dogs.
  • Wrappers, aluminum foil, etc. Dogs have an excellent sense of smell and will sniff out wrappers or packages that contain traces of food. Wrappers are often unable to pass and may cause obstructions that require surgery to remove. Keep your countertops clean and take your trash out frequently (into a securely locked area).


Feed your dog a high quality natural pet food before any festivities to help them feel more satisfied and less likely to beg or steal food from partygoers. As a safeguard, inform all friends and family that your dog is not to be fed any of the holiday fare. You or your guests can also reward your dog with natural, low-calorie, nutritious treats during a party to reinforce the message of "paws off" the holiday food.




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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:42 PM)


Pets' Influence on the Elderly
By Barbara Sharnak for WebVet


Animals fill a void in the lives of the elderly who are alone without friends or loved ones. 

Pets can greatly increase quality of life for many senior citizens. Dr. Sandra Barker, director of the Center 

for Human-Animal Interaction at Virginia Commonwealth University, recalls the story of Annie, a depressed 

95-year-old who, after being given a dog named Pumpkin, began to eat again. When Annie’s landlord sued 

her for violating a no-pet policy, she was asked in deposition what would happen if Pumpkin were taken 

away. “I’ll die,” Annie replied.




Pets for the Elderly Foundation matches seniors with cats and dogs by underwriting the pets’ adoptions. 

“Those who are responsible for a pet are likely to take better care of themselves, because they feel 

someone is counting on them,” said general manager Susan Kurowski. The Waltham Book of Human-Animal 

Interactions published a study of elderly dog owners revealing 75 percent of men and 67 percent of women 

considered their dog their only friend.




While Pets for the Elderly focuses on matching senior citizens with cats and dogs, birds, rabbits and fish still 

provide the desired effects. The Waltham Book of Human-Animal Interactions also published a study that 

found elderly women in nursing homes preferred an hour-long session interacting with a rabbit to an hour 

of open leisure time. Animals don’t judge the people who love them, making the comfort of a lap animal, 

the liveliness of an aviary, or an aquarium’s tranquility unconditional pleasures.

Proof on the chartsDonna Williamson and her cat, Moochie, participants in the Delta Society Pet Partner Program, were called 

on to visit a terminal patient. When they arrived, family members greeted them in tears as the patient had 

slipped into a coma. Donna put Moochie in bed with the man, who awoke from the coma, took his arms out 

from under the sheets and began petting the cat. “The nurse sat there with her mouth wide open,” 

Williamson said. “Every time I see that nurse, she relates what a miracle that was.”




The Delta Society is committed to improving human health through service and therapy animals. While 

animals are proven health aids to all people, their benefits to senior citizens is extraordinary. A study 

published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that elderly pet owners are more active, 

cope better with stress, and have lower blood pressure than seniors without pets.




Dr. Edward Creagan of the Mayo Clinic Medical School observed, “If pet ownership was a medication, it 

would be patented tomorrow.” Whether it’s walking a dog or brushing a cat, activity benefits the 

cardiovascular system and helps keep joints flexible. Creagan cited a study of patients 12 months after 

suffering heart attacks, finding 9 out of 10 of those with pets survived, opposed to 7 out of 10 without pets. 

A study in the Journal of Personality and Social Issues reveals that dogs, especially, promote exercise; 

owners spend an average of 1.5 hours outdoors daily. Even fish foster healthy living – a Purdue University 

study found that the presence of an aquarium at mealtimes increases appetites of Alzheimer’s patients who 

don't eat enough for good nutrition.

Introducing a social life“We had an elderly gentleman 
adopt a puppy today,” Michelle McCann of participant PAWS in Ft. Walton 

Beach, Fla., wrote to Pets for the Elderly. “He was standing in the lobby holding his puppy as we all 'oohed' 

and 'ahhed,' and he was laughing about what a chick magnet his puppy was going to be!”




Animals are indeed social magnets. Nursing home communities such as Silverado and Eden Alternative were 

founded on principles of meaningful interactions driven by an animal-filled environment. Administrator 

Noralynn Snow houses dogs, cats, birds, fish – even kangaroos – at Silverado’s Aspen Park facility. The 

latter especially, she says, has the “ooh, ahh” factor, which encourages families normally shy of the 

residents at the home, to visit. Cooperative animal care also spurs interaction between the residents.

Different pets, different fretsThough all animals offer benefits to the elderly, some are better suited toward certain individuals. The 

International Journal of Aging and Human Development found that cats offer many of the social aspects 

sought by lonely people who cannot provide the 
regular exercise dogs require.




Additionally, “Many elderly people also get a real satisfaction out of caged birds,” said Dr. William Fortney of 

Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. “They are easy keepers and very social animals.” 

Noralynn Snow of Silverado notes that bird noises are especially important to those who are bedridden, 

because they can derive a sense of the outdoors from birds. Even rats provide companionship. Veterinarian 

Dr. Cam Day says, “Rats are easy to keep and are not expensive to buy. I know of a hip granny who has a 

pet rat and adores it, too.”

Bottom line“Policies that encourage pet ownership among the aged, either at home or as they make the transition to 

elder living facilities, can improve some medical conditions and alleviate loneliness,” said Nalini Saligram, 

board chair of PAWSitive InterAction. Be it on a doctor’s chart or in the wordless testimony of the animal 

itself, creatures of all kinds strengthen the lives they touch.







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RE:Dog Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:44 PM)


Should You Sleep With Your Dog? The Pros and Cons of Sharing the Bed
by Daphne Sashin (Subscribe to Daphne Sashin's posts) Jul 27th 2010 @ 12:00PM Filed Under: Dogs, Pet Health

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In the darkest hours of Bruce Sallan's divorce when he didn't want to get out of bed, his two dogs were there jumping on the mattress and licking his face. And when his worries kept him awake at night, the big black German Shepherd mix and the Pointer mix with brown and white spots were there then too, lying beside him on top of the covers.

"Petting one of my dogs was almost like a way I'd calm myself down and fall asleep," says Sallan, a writer and radio host in California. But then he met and married Debbie, who had a dog of her own but suffered from allergies and liked her furniture free of dirt and hair. She was adamant: "No dogs in bed."

"He would have his dog on the bed and there would be dog hair on my pillow and I'd be sneezing," Debbie tells Paw Nation. The solution? She spent several hundred dollars on plush beds for all three dogs and ultimately, everyone was happy.

The Stats
Some pet owners may be sheepish to admit it, but Sallan is far from alone. A 2007 survey of more than 2,500 pet owners by the American Pet Products Association found 43 percent of dogs slept in a person's bed at night, a steady increase from 34 percent a decade ago.

So is there anything wrong with pets in the bed? Like Bruce and Debbie, vets and animal trainers have strong opinions on the subject.

The Pros
Sleeping in the same bed has strong emotional benefits for you and your pooch.

1. It's comforting to both the owners and the animals. The company of pets have been proven to lower blood pressure, stress and reduce feelings of loneliness. According to veterinarian Ira Roth, director of the
Community Practice Clinic at University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, having them close to you at night only magnifies those benefits, whether the animal is at the foot of the bed or under the covers.

Illinois dog owner Jamie Hand agrees with that assessment. "Rocky likes to cuddle, and he always has to be right next to me," Hand tells Paw Nation, referring to her Jack Russell Terrier mix who is very content sleeping in his owner's bed. "If I roll away from him, he scoots over so he's right next to my torso again. This doesn't disrupt my sleep at all. In fact, it's quite comforting to feel him snuggling up against me."

2. It can deepen the bond between dog and owner. New York City dog trainer Sarah Westcott, owner of
Doggie Academy, always gave her dogs their own beds. But then she adopted Hank, a lab who kept to himself.

"Out of the blue one day, I put him in bed and he curled up next to me," Westcott says. Everything changed after that. "Whatever he's doing, even when he's a hyper maniac, if I invite him in bed he settles right down."

3. It can give nervous dogs more confidence. Sherry Bedard, an animal trainer and behaviorist in Montreal and author of
"Sherry's Secret Dictionary, A Guide to your Dog" believes that the assurance boost of sharing the bed with their owners can "help the dog cope with everyday functions such as going out for a walk in public or meeting strangers."

The Cons
From health reasons to relationships concerns, there are strong arguments against sharing the bed.

1. It can intensify allergies. Your airways are more susceptible to irritants at night, partly because when you're lying down, you're closer to the ground, where particles settle. Multiply that by plus or minus 8 hours and that's a lot of exposure, says Frank S. Virant, MD, an allergy and asthma specialist in Seattle. Plus, pet dander and fur stays on the pillow long after the animal has left the room. If you find yourself sniffling or wheezing, the pet should leave the bedroom, Virant tells Paw Nation.

2. It can amp up human/canine power struggles. Orlando dog trainer Todd Langston, owner of
Pack Life K-9 Behavior Solutions believes that giving the dog the highest, most comfortable spot in the house sends the message that he is the leader of the pack. "Many of these dogs will even growl at their owners if they wake them in the middle of the night or snap at them if they try to get them off the bed," says Langston.

Westcott realized that she had this problem on her hands when her dog Hank began growling at her boyfriend Vinny, when he tried to get in bed. "Immediately I said OK, we can't have that. First and foremost this is mine and Vinny's bed. Hank was no longer allowed in bed until I had some time to work with him," Westcott tells Paw Nation. "I would invite him on the bed and say 'Up' and I'd give him chicken, and I'd say 'Off' and give him chicken. After working with him and really teaching him that it's not a terrible thing to be told to get off the bed, he willingly got off."

3. Noisy or pushy dogs can keep you from getting a good night's rest. In a 2001 study by the Mayo Clinic, more than half of pet owners seeking treatment for sleep disorders said their pets disturbed their sleep every night because of snoring, needing to go outside or hogging the bed.

"Having a pet that constantly moves around in bed or prevents you from sleeping in your preferred position can diminish the quality of your sleep affecting your daytime mood, focus, memory and concentration," says New York dog trainer Sheryl Matthys, author of "
Leashes and Lovers: What Your Dog Can Teach You About Love, Life, and Happiness."

Matthys speaks from experience. She and her husband used to fight for bed space with two greyhounds, leading to many nights of "trying to shift around the long furry bodies in the middle of our bed." Ultimately she opted for comfy dog beds. "Although I do miss cuddling with our dogs, I have to admit I'm more refreshed in the morning," Matthys says.

4. It can cause arguments between couples. "I can tell you stories about fighting with a German Shepherd for room on my ex-boyfriend's full-size bed," says Christie Hyde, a public relations professional from Daytona Beach. "Apparently I was expected to sleep curled in a ball at the top of the bed."

Hyde's concerns weren't only about her discomfort but also about what bringing the dog into the bed meant to her relationship. When the long-distance boyfriend came to stay at her house, Hyde kept her pit-bull mix, Amber, out of the bedroom. "When he started inviting Amber to join us in bed -- and she would crawl right in between us -- I knew our relationship was heading in the wrong direction. We got to spend so little time together, I didn't care to share that much of it with our dogs," Hyde tells Paw Nation.

So the dog stayed, and the boyfriend went.


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