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Title: Cat Info
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(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:33 PM)
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"X" Marks the Spot – Is Your Cat Worried About Outside Cats?
Jan 15, 2013 9:23:00 AM by Mieshelle Nagelschneider

Spraying (urine marking) is a frustrating and seemingly hopeless issue for many cat owners. Many believe that once a cat begins to spray he will always do it - a belief that couldn't be further from the truth. In fact, spraying can be one of the easiest behavior issues to eliminate out of a cat's repertoire if you can find the cause for why it began in the first place. Unfortunately, many cat owners lose hope before seeking behavior help and choose to relinquish their cats to a shelter, which can often result in euthanasia.

Cats can urine spray-mark for a number of reasons, but territorial concerns are very high on the list. Territorial spray-marking can be triggered by common day to day events that you may not even be aware of. One of the most common and under-appreciated reasons that a cat may spray is his awareness of other cats lurking outside his home. Seeing other cats outside (through a window is enough) can cause territorial concerns that are enough to send your home into a urine war zone. You may not even think that there are outside cats in your neighborhood until you find vertical marking in your home. Outside cats often hunt in the morning between 3 and 5 a.m. If you mainly find new urine markings in the mornings, your cat may be seeing (and feeling threatened by) these early morning hunters.

Cats can spray urine on horizontal surfaces, but it is most often done on vertical ones as your cat backs up to the area in a standing position with a vertical and vibrating tail and typically treading front paws. A tell-tale sign that your cat is worried about his territory being breached is vertical urine placement around the perimeter of your home (on exterior doors, curtains, windows, furniture near windows, exterior walls, etc.).

Though spraying is most common in males,
female cats can vertical spray too. The majority of neutered and spayed cats do not spray, but because cats are territorial by nature, it is possible in a triggering environment. If your un-neutered or un-spayed cat has already begun to urine mark, neutering or spaying will usually end the behavior.

Many cat owners think that any urine they find around the home is marking. This isn't necessarily the case. Normal urination is done in a squatting position and is a different behavior that should not be confused with urine spray-marking. If your cat is placing urine around the home in any way (vertically or horizontally), be sure to schedule a vet visit to rule out medical issues.

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:37 PM)


What is Catnip?

We have a tiny little cat section here at Life on the Leash. I call it the Kitty Corner. And the space is dominated by catnip toys. We’ve got some pretty feather wands, and a few different types of treats, but there’s catnip hiding in every single plush toy on the shelf. After chatting with some of my cat people and learning that not every cat reacts to catnip, I decided to get the 411 on the 420 of [font=ARIAL, 'HELVETICA NEUE', VERDANA, SANS-SERIF]the [/font][font=ARIAL, 'HELVETICA NEUE', VERDANA, SANS-SERIF]cat[/font] world.

Is catnip a drug? Nope. It’s an easy-to-grow perennial herb in the mint family. I bought a few plants years ago not realizing that the exotic sounding “Neptea” plant with pretty blue flowers was just plain old catnip. It almost took over my flower bed.

The Joy of Catnip

Why doesn’t every cat respond to catnip? The catnip “high” is hereditary, and about 30% of cats are unaffected by it. Kittens under 10-weeks typically don’t show a response.

Can cats “overdose” on catnip? Though the dramatic responses to catnip can range from blissed-out mellowness to intense drooling and rolling, there is no inherent danger to letting
[font=ARIAL, 'HELVETICA NEUE', VERDANA, SANS-SERIF]your [/font][font=ARIAL, 'HELVETICA NEUE', VERDANA, SANS-SERIF]cat[/font] “get lifted.” Catnip is nontoxic to cats. The initial reaction typically lasts 5 to 15 minutes, and cannot be repeated until an hour later, or longer. (Some cats won’t react until a day later.)

Catnip: A Favorite Feline Treat

So go ahead and let your cat enjoy a few minutes of herbal haze! Do you have a feline ‘nip fiend in your house?

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:42 PM)


10 Things to Know Before Getting a Cat

  You'll want to be prepared to take on a new set of responsibilities when you bring a cat into your life.
By Kate Karczewski for
WebVet
Reviewed by Amy I. Attas, VMD

 


1. Owning a cat is a lifelong commitment. Cats can live up to 20 years; be sure you're ready to provide food, shelter, and love for your cat's life. Major changes, such as
switching owners and houses, can be very stressful for cats.





2. Be prepared for the financial responsibilities that come with having a cat. The average annual cost is anywhere from $800-$1,000. That includes quality food, litter, toys, and routine
medical costs. Emergency care or treating an illness can range from $250–$2,000.

3. Cats, like all pets, need sufficient love and attention. Creating a human bond is crucial to developing a lasting relationship with your cat. Most cats will want to be near you when you're home; make an effort to pet your cat whenever you pass it. Devote time every day to playing with your cat and engaging it in physical and mental stimulation. Each cat is different and desires different levels of attention. As you and your cat get to know each other, you'll know when your cat wants attention and when it does not.

4. Cats do not need to go outside. Indoor cats live much longer than outdoor cats. Outdoor cats have a higher risk of contracting diseases or being killed by cars or other animals. Indoor cats can have very fulfilling lives as long as you provide them with food, water, love, and a stimulating environment. Make sure your cat has access to plenty of sunlight and windows.

5. Before you take your new cat home, make sure you have all of the basic supplies. These include high-quality food, food and water bowls (steel, glass or ceramic preferred) litter box and litter, toys, a scratching post and a carrier for trips to the vet.

6. "Cat–proof" your house or apartment to make sure you don't have any
items that could be harmful to your new cat. These can include poisonous plants, shopping bags, plastic bags, ribbon, string, twine, yarn and chemical cleaners. The ASPCA Poison Control Hotline (888–426–4435 ) provides valuable information about household substances that can be harmful to your cat.



7. Take care in introducing your new cat into your household, especially if you're introducing the cat to a new baby. Cats thrive on the comfort, security and familiarity of their environment. Let the cat explore every nook and cranny of the house or apartment. This allows your cat to feel secure in its new surroundings. If there are children, teach them how to properly hold and pet the cat. Children should also be taught some basic cat body language so that they will know to leave the cat alone when its ears are back, its tail is twitching, or it is growling or hissing.

8. Introduce your cat to its litter box. Your cat should be able to comfortably get in the box, and there should be plenty of room for it to perform its elimination ritual of sniffing, digging, squatting, and turning around and then covering up the feces. The box should be private and easily accessible. Once the location of the box is established, don't move it.
Clean the box at least twice daily.

9. Scratching is an innate behavior and should be addressed by providing your cat with the proper equipment and place to scratch. A scratching post should be at least 30 inches tall so your cat can fully stretch its front legs. It should be made of soft wood or wrapped with sisal rope (not carpeting), and mounted on a stable base that won't tip.

10. Self–grooming is a large part of a cat's life. But you should still brush your cat at least once a week with a soft–bristled brush to maintain a soft, shiny and healthy coat and to reduce the possibility of hairballs.



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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:45 PM)


NYC feline regains the use of her paw through hydrotherapy.




Cats aren't supposed to like water, but don't tell that to Nazzaning, a 6-year Turkish Van feline who is a fully-functioning kitty once more thanks to thrice-weekly hydrotherapy sessions.


Nazzaning's troubles began last month when owner Florence Rostami believed her beloved kitty, whose name means "Dear One" in Turkish, broke her front paw. Rostami rushed her to the vet, only to discover that Nazzaning's paw wasn't fractured. Worse, an MRI detected swelling on part of her vertebrae, which caused the paw paralysis.

The solution?

A neurologist at the NYC Veterinary Specialists, which was treating Nazzaning suggested an unorthodox treatment — hydrotherapy — balking at the notion that all cats hate H2O.

“I was very happy,” Rostami told the Today show. “Turkish Vans are natural swimmers, and I thought that this might wake up her instinct.”

Wake up her instinct it did, and she became a trailblazer at Water 4 Dogs, which, as the name suggests, had previously been a canine-exclusive aqua rehabilitation center.

“She was definitely nervous about what was going on, and she was vocal and meowing,” said Jean Marie Cooper, the manager at Water 4 Dogs. “At first she was balling up and not moving, but after a few treatments, I think she started feeling better and relaxed.”

Treatment for the now-cooperative kitty is two-fold. First, she walks for 30 minutes on a treadmill submerged in 4 to 5 inches of 92-degree water, with a therapist guiding her to keep her upright and ensure proper paw placement. Once that's done, the fun begins: she kitty-paddles around the 4 1/2-foot pool with slight help from a therapist to strengthen her limbs and provide all-over exercise.

"I only hold her to make sure her ears don't get wet," therapist John Larson told the New York Post.

Rostami now says her kitty is at home and back to her loving, moody, demanding self (she is a typical cat, after all).

Nazzaning is one of the first felines to successfully recuperate thanks to hydrotherapy. And recently, Tonic told you about Oscar, the world's first bionic cat. So what does all this mean?

It's a pretty good time to be a kitty.

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:49 PM)


Cat Jumps 70 Feet Off Bridge — and Lives!

She could have been destroyed by the heat of the truck engine, or passed over as road kill. She could have even been splattered over the Cowlitz River to wash away like another fallen leaf.

An 18-month-old cat tumbled out of a truck crossing Washington's Allen Street Bridge on June 3. Disoriented, she was then
hit by another car in traffic, then somehow jumped over the guard rail, falling 70 feet and landing on the asphalt below. She should have died, but somehow, she survived.

A driver following the truck that carried the cat watched in horror as the events unfolded. Shocked by the jump, the observer weaved through traffic, eventually finding her way under the bridge, where she searched for the cat that she assumed was dead.

Instead, the good Samaritan found the cat crouched under a van in a parking lot, and called the
Humane Society of Cowlitz County for help.

Vets examined her, and found that she escaped the hit and fall with just a broken front leg and a cracked palate in the roof of her mouth.

"It hit the ground so hard, it cracked the palate, it was about a two-inch crack," Rick Johnson, the shelter's executive director, tells
PEOPLEPets.com. "Takes a pretty good force to do that."

They named her Amelia, Johnson says, because "she flew."

She went home that night to be fostered by a shelter volunteer, and lost a litter of kittens. "No one knew," Johnson says. "[That first day,] everybody was more interested in making sure the cat lived."

Since, Amelia's leg has been set in a cast, and her palate is healing as well. She is also extraordinarily well-tempered, gets along with cats and humans, and has a personality that's "absolutely perfect."

"Yesterday, I walked into her room, and she was laying face down," Johnson says. "We stuck a 2-week-old kitten in her pen. Amelia rolls over, lifts her leg up, and says, 'Milk's over here.' She's an awesome kitty."

See more unbelievable survival stories on PEOPLEPets.com:


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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:52 PM)


Cat Urine Problems,
Stop Those Nasty Odours With A Little Cat Care.

http://www.our-happy-cat.com/cat-urine.html
Cat urine spraying indoors can be a sign of a underlining illness and so you should not assume that your cat is just being naughty or lazy.

Unfortunately many cats are put down or given away because of this problem, when all that is needed is a little time, investigation and good cat care.


What Are The Possible Causes. If your cat suddenly starts to urinate in the home, then you may have to take them to the Vets to rule out any possible health issues.

The two main health issues that you need to rule our are Cystitis and a urinary tract disorder, of which there are a few and are commonly known as either FLUTD "Feline lower urinary tract disorder or FUS Feline urologic syndrome.

Stress can also be a cause of cat urine problems starting up. Something may have changed which is causing your cat to feel insecure, these could include:
  • A new pet
  • A new baby
  • Are they being bullied by other cats?
  • Have you changed their environment, i.e. decorated or moved furniture?
  • Have you changed their litter brand?
Luckily over time your cat will calm down once they are used to the new situation and the spraying should stop and they should return to being a normal happy cat. If the behaviour continues there are some anti anxiety drugs which your vet could prescribe, to help calm your pet down until they become more relaxed with the situation. It is best to discuss this with your vet.


Communication Cat spraying is a form of communication for your cat as it contains a pheromone which gives other cats various messages.

Cats will often mark their territory with a small jet of urine and the cat urine odor tells other cats in the area to stay away.

This is mainly done by un-neutered male cats outside and can start as early as 5 months old.

When this happens inside the home, it is normally a sign the cat feels threatened and needs to stake its claim to the property.

During the mating season both male and female un-neutered cats will spray to let other cats know in the area that they are available for mating.

It is the un-neutered male pet urine, which has the distinctive strong smell, which we as humans find so obnoxious.

How do I stop my cat from spraying? The best way to stop the cat urine scent marking is to have your cat neutered. This removes their desire to be competitive with other cats in the area.

If your cat keeps on spraying in the same places inside your home there are a few methods you could try to break this habit.
  • Thoroughly clean the area with a special odour eliminator. Ordinary household disinfectant will not get rid of the smell.
  • Put your cat's food bowl over or near the area, as they will not urinate near to their food.
  • Provide a clean litter tray in an area where the cat can feel private.
In extreme cases you may have to isolate your cat in a room with only it's bed, a litter tray and water, this is a training method designed to help your cat get back into the habit of using the tray.

This is not a punishment and your cat should still be cuddled and played with and fed in its usual place.

This is to get the cat used to using the litter tray when it wants to urinate in the house. Gradually the cat can be allowed in other areas of the house, but if you see any signs of the behaviour returning then you will have to start the process over again.

Odours

Removing those nasty cat urine odors from your furniture and carpets etc. can be a bit of a problem and if not done right may encourage your cat to continue to spray.

We have therefore dedicated a whole page to the subject of cat urine cleaners and odour removers, which should provide you with all the ammunition you will need to combat this smelly problem.



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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:56 PM)


Breed Profile: The Persian Cat
The Cat Fanciers Association,Inc.

http://www.cfainc.org/breeds/profiles/persian.html

 
Debs' Cat, Misty
now at the rainbow bridge
 

As the dusty desert caravans wound their way westward from Persia and Iran, it is supposed that secreted among the rare spices and jewels on the basket-laden camels was an even more precious cargo, an occasional longhair cat. They were called Persian for their "country of origin," but hieroglyphic references as early as 1684 B.C. shroud forever their exact beginnings.

Persians, with their long flowing coats and open pansy-like faces are the number one breed in popularity. Their sweet, gentle, personalities blend into most households once they feel secure in their new environment. Creatures of habit, they are most at home in an atmosphere of security and serenity, but with love and reassurance, can easily adapt to the most boisterous of households. Their quiet, melodious voices are pleasant and non-abrasive. They communicate delightfully with their large expressive eyes and make charming pets for all ages. Persians have short heavily-boned legs to support their broad, short bodies. They like to have their feet firmly planted and are not given to high jumping and climbing. Playful but never demanding, they love to pose and will drape themselves in a favorite window or chair, enhancing the decor in much the same way as a treasured painting. Persians are tremendously responsive and become a constant source of joy and delight to their owners. Pleasurable as an unexpected sunbeam, their companionship is close and enduring.

Their long flowing coats require an indoor, protected environment. Proper maintenance requires a daily run-through with a metal comb to eliminate the potential drawbacks of tangles and hairballs. An occasional bath, attempted only after a complete comb-through and clipping of the nail tips, will keep the coat clean, healthy and beautiful. It is wise to establish the routine of the bath when they are young. While the white Persian has long been the darling of photographers and advertisers, Persians come in an astonishing number of colors, which are divided into seven color divisions for purposes of competition. Those are:

Keeping the Persian indoors also keeps it safe from transmission of disease and parasites, as well as the dangers of urban life. With an annual trip to a trusted veterinarian, and good nutrition and care, the Persian can live as a family member for easily 15 years, and some surpassing 20 years. Persian breeders dedicate themselves to breeding healthy cats, availing themselves of the latest in veterinary screening procedures to test for any heritable disease conditions. A well-bred Persian is a hardy and healthy cat and is not more prone to illness and respiratory infections than other breeds. However, the large eyes do mean that a certain amount of tearing is normal, and a daily face wash is recommended.

Balance and refinement are the essence of the breed, where all parts come together in a harmonious whole, with neither too muchnor too little consideration given to any one feature.

GENERAL:
The ideal Persian should present an impression of a
heavily boned, well-balanced cat with a sweet expression and soft,round lines. The large round eyes set wide apart in a large roundhead contribute to the overall look and expression. The long thick coat softens the lines of the cat and accentuates the roundness in appearance.

HEAD:
Round and massive, with great breadth of skull. Round face
with round underlying bone structure. Well set on a short, thick neck. Skull structure to be smooth and round to the touch and not unduly exaggerated from where the forehead begins at the top of the breakto the back of the head, as well as across the breadth between the ears. When viewed in profile, the prominence of the eyes is apparent and the forehead, nose, and chin appear to be in vertical alignment.
NOSE:
Short, snub, and broad, with "break" centered between the
eyes.
CHEEKS:
Full. Muzzle not overly pronounced, smoothing nicely into
the cheeks.
JAWS:
Broad and powerful.
CHIN:
Full, well-developed, and firmly rounded, reflecting a proper
bite.
EARS:
Small, round tipped, tilted forward, and not unduly open at
the base. Set far apart, and low on the head, fitting into (without distorting) the rounded contour of the head.
EYES:
Brilliant in color, large, round, and full. Set level and far apart,
giving a sweet expression to the face.
BODY:
Of cobby type, low on the legs, broad and deep through the
chest, equally massive across the shoulders and rump, with a wellrounded mid-section and level back. Good muscle tone with no evidence of obesity. Large or medium in size. Quality the determining consideration rather than size.
LEGS:
Short, thick, and strong. Forelegs straight. Hind legs are
straight when viewed from behind.
PAWS:
Large, round, and firm. Toes carried close, five in front and
four behind .
TAIL:
Short, but in proportion to body length. Carried without a curve
and at an angle lower than the back.
COAT:
Long and thick, standing off from the body. Of fine texture,
glossy and full of life. Long all over the body, including the shoulders. The ruff immense and continuing in a deep frill between the
front legs. Ear and toe tufts long. Brush very full.
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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:57 PM)


Why Do ...??

Have you ever wondered why cats sulk, do they dream, why and how do they purr, why they knead, why they bury their waste products, why do they hiss and spit, are they smart? Here you will find answers to many cat behaviors and characteristics which are human curiosities, but the norm to cats.
What do the different ear postitions mean?
There are five basic ear signals, revealing if the cat is feeling relaxed, alert, agitated, defensive or aggressive. When the ears are pointed forward and slightly outward, the cat is relaxed and carefully listening to everything that is going on. When erect and facing forward, the cat is alert and ready to investigate any noise that has been heard. When they twitch nervously back and forth, the cat is agitated or anxious. The ear twitching may be accompanied by two quick flicks of the tongue around the lips. When the ears are flattened tightly against the head, the cat is signaling annoyance and is feeling defensive. A cat will pin the ears back to protect them during a fight. When feeling aggressive but not frightened, a cat's ears will be in a position somewhere between alert and defensive.

What can we tell about a cat's behavior
from his fur?
When alarmed or startled, the hair will stand up on all over the body. When threatened (as when another cat is about to attack), the hair stands up only in a narrow band along the spine and on the tail. The hair will incline slightly toward the middle from both sides, and will form a sharp ridge. This will make the cat appear larger than he is to any enemies.

What does the different positions of the whiskers reveal?
When pointed forward and fanned out, the cat is tense - alert, excited and ready to act. When the whiskers are bunched together and flattened to the side of the face, he is feeling reserved, timid, or shy. When pointed sideways and aren't spread out, the cat is comfortable, calm, relaxed, friendly, satisfied, or indifferent.

Why do cats arch their backs?
The cat's arching back is actually part of his complex body-language system. Not only does he arch his back as a form of stretching "sleepy" muscles after a nap, the arched back is also a form of showing that the cat is feeling threatened. In the latter case, the arched back is usually accompanied by his hair standing out all over his body, especially on his tail. He may even turn sideways to present an even more impressive profile to scare away a threatening animal. His arch is able to get so high because his spine contains nearly 60 vertebrae (humans only have about 34) which fit together loosely, giving him that incredible flexibility.

Why do cats suddenly take off
at 90 miles an hour?
This behavior is due to pent-up energy that suddenly overflows. Cats are nocturnal beings and natural hunters. Even in an environment where there's nothing to hunt, or the cat no longer needs to hunt, he will feel the need to hunt anyway. At full hilt, a cat clocks an amazing 31 mph and covers about three times his own length per leap. Cheetahs, which are the fastest land animals, hit their stride at around 70 mph.

What does it mean when a cat
does that unusual little hop?
When a cat zips over to you, bumps against your leg, quickly lifts both front paws off the ground together and puts them down again in a little hoplike manner, it's generally reserved just for humans. It's a throwback to the head-to-head greeting behavior he learned from his mother. She would lower her head to make face-to-face contact and rub noses with him in order to mingle scents. Since humans are so tall, and a cat is so short, this is his welcoming greeting.

More WHY DO CATS ... ?? to come in the future.
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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 10:59 PM)


PARTS IS PARTS
PART 1A
CATS

Debs gave me a great idea about explaining
the different body parts of our pets.
Luckily I was able to find diagrams and
some explanations.I hope you find this series
interesting and worthwhile.



ANATOMY OF A CAT
Shelby Neely
Feline Veterinarian
Pennsylvania

I am a "feline only" veterinarian. I was born surrounded
by cats because my Father loved cats. I either inherited a gene
from him that made me instantaneously love cats or became
a cat lover just from always having them around me
.

The most important thing to know is how all the parts of a "normal" cat's body look. You need to know what's normal obviously before you can know that something is abnormal. Once you know normal, anything different is worth questioning your vet about.

(1)
Ears

Look at your cat's face straight-on and compare the two ears. Are they both standing up, uniform in size and shape?

Now, look inside each one under good lighting conditions. Are they the same inside? Are they pink? Do they smell? They shouldn't. Are they perfectly free of wax or other debris? They should be. Most of the time, healthy cats have incredibly clean ears.
To check your cat's hearing, stand behind the cat, making sure that he absolutely can't see you and clap loudly. He should turn around or jump or at the very least, flick his ears quite obviously.

(2) Eyes

Again, while looking at your cat's face straight-on, determine whether the eyes are the same size. Are they shaped the same way? Are the pupils (the black center) equal in size? Are the pupils easy to see or is it at all cloudy in front of them? It shouldn't be.
The cornea is the clear "covering" of the eye that you really shouldn't see at all as you are looking at the pupils. Is it cloudy instead? Are there blood vessels obvious on the cornea? There shouldn't be.
If you shine a bright light in one eye, do the pupils in both eyes get smaller and are they the same size? When you take the bright light away, do they both get larger and, again, are they the same size?
If you move your finger back and forth to the left and right does your cat follow your finger with both eyes? How about up and down? If you throw a cotton ball a small distance away, does your cat see the cotton ball?
Are the inner corners of the eyes clean? Is there any discharge coming from the eyes? Is the cat squinting? Do the eyelids look at all swollen? Is the "3rd eyelid" visible? It shouldn't be.
It is very possible for a cat to lose its sight and the owner not know. I have had several clients come in with their cat and tell me that he sees just fine because he makes his way around the house and never bumps into anything. Yet, when I check the cat's eyes and vision, he is completely blind.
How is that possible? Cats are able to so quickly adapt and find their way around familiar surroundings, that as long as nothing is out of place in the house, you may never know they're blind.
To make sure your cat can see, you can use the cotton ball trick. You also should place a chair or other object in the middle of the room, call your cat to come to you and see if he goes easily around the chair or bumps into it.

PART 1B - CATS
will continue with the next edition

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:01 PM)


PARTS IS PARTS
PART 1B
CATS

Debs gave me a great idea about explaining
the different body parts of our pets.
Luckily I was able to find diagrams and
some explanations.I hope you find this series
interesting and worthwhile.



ANATOMY OF A CAT
Shelby Neely
Feline Veterinarian
Pennsylvania

I am a "feline only" veterinarian. I was born surrounded by cats because my Father loved cats. I either inherited a gene from him that made me instantaneously love cats or became a cat lover just from
always having them around me
.

The most important thing to know is how all the parts of a "normal" cat's body look. You need to know what's normal obviously before you can know that something is abnormal. Once you know normal, anything different is worth questioning your vet about.

(3) Nose
Looking at your cat's face again, are the nostrils the same size? Are they free of discharge or debris? Is there any swelling of the nose? Does your cat breathe quietly or can you hear noise when he breathes? Is your cat's nose pink?

(4) Mouth
Examining a cat's mouth can be very difficult. I certainly don't want you to get bitten doing it. IF you can, you should gently lift the upper lip on one side and look at the gums and teeth. Are the gums pink, not red or white? If they are red and inflammed looking or very pale or white, that is cause for concern. Are the gums moist? They should be. Are the teeth white? If they're not, they have a build-up on them just like people get and cats need their teeth professionally cleaned just as we do. Dental care for cats has been much over-looked in the past and is SO necessary. Taking care of your cat's teeth is important not only for the comfort of the cat, but to prevent spread of infection to other organs of the body.
Don't assume just because you see a couple of teeth and they look ok, that all the teeth are fine. If you can't see both sides and front of the upper and lower teeth and your cat's teeth haven't been examined by a vet in the last year, make that appointment.

If your cat lets you open his mouth easily,
try to get at his tongue as well.Are there ulcers? Is it a healthy, normal pink color?

Is the thickness uniform or is any part of the tongue harder and thicker than the rest?
Schedule regular dental check-up's
for your cat.
(5) CHIN
Feel and look at your cat's chin for two reasons primarily.

(a) Rub your
hand along the bony ridges of the chin and note whether they feel the same and there's no prominent hard thickness on one side that's not on the other.Cats can get cancer of the jawbone.
(b)Does the skin covering the jawbone
feel smooth and free of bumps? If there are
bumps,your kitty may have feline acne and
need to see the vet.


(6)
Neck
Just rub your hands gently all over your kitty's
neck, underneath and on top. Feel mainly for
symmetry and lumps. If you feel something on
one side that is not on the other, it may be cause
for concern.

PART 1C - CATS
will continue with the next edition

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:03 PM)


OPEN WIDE, KITTY!
The Importance of Dental Care for Your Cat
By Franny Syufy, About.com

http://cats.about.com/cs/dentalhealth/a ... _kitty.htm


Although cat owners may have sharp eyes at spotting symptoms of illness in our furry friends, many of us have taken a more casual approach to dental health. It is not surprising, therefore, to learn that 85% of adult pets have periodontal disease, and that dental disease is the largest single cause of health problems in cats.


Forms and Causes of Dental Disease

  • Peridontal Disease
    Caused when a buildup of plaque calcifies, forming tartar, which pushes food debris and bacteria under the gum line, infecting the gum and bone structure that support the teeth. Inflamed gums, swelling, bleeding gums or bad breath are among the symptoms. As in humans, peridontal disease is the most common dental diseases in cats. Treatment for this disease includes antibiotics, dental cleaning, and extraction for advanced cases.
  • Feline Stomatitis
    Stomatitis, also known as Lymphocytic Plasmacytic Stomatitis (LPS) is a serious and frequently misunderstood condition. It is thought to be an autoimmune disease (the body becomes allergic to plaque around the teeth), and is often found in cats with other autoimmune conditions, such as FIV and FeLV. Although not gingivitis, it is often found alongside gingivitis. Feline Stomatitis involves inflammation of the mouth which may extend into the throat or pharynx, causing angry, red lesions described as "cobblestone" in appearance. Cats with stomatitis suffer a great deal of pain, often affecting their eating habits. You may even see an affected cat pawing at its mouth.
  • Feline Odontoclastic Oral Resorption Lesions (FORL)
    These painful lesions start as shallow pits that occur in the enamel and dentine of a tooth. Plaque accumulates, and the tissue surrounding the affected tooth becomes inflamed. If the condition worsens, the pit may extend into the tooth pulp, essentially killing the tooth. FORL are diagnosed through oral examination and oral radiographs. Extraction is usually the treatment of choice.
  • Malocclusion
    Malocclusion is usually visually evident, and can cause difficulty in eating, along with subsequent weight loss. Veterinary medicine has come so far that now there are veterinary dentists who specialize in orthodontics.

One final note: Although evidence of pain in eating may be a symptom of feline dental disease, it is usually one of the last symptoms. Don't wait until these symptoms present, to save your kitty's teeth. With daily brushing, regular home examination, a well-balanced diet, and regular veterinary examination, you may never have to witness such evidence of your loved one's suffering.

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:06 PM)


Why Do Cats...??

Have you ever wondered why cats sulk, do they dream, why and how do they purr, why they knead, why they bury their waste products, why do they hiss and spit, are they smart? Here you will find answers to many cat behaviors and characteristics which are human curiosities, but the norm to cats.

Why do cats sulk?
Humans are huge to a cat. When you scold him, you are intimidating him. And when you look down upon a cat to discipline him, he associates your fixed gaze with a rival. The eyes of many animals are a signal of power. In comparison to a cat's size, his eyes are enormous. In hostile situations, a dominant cat will stare at his rival, who will look away rather than increase the hostility. So when your cat turns away after disciplining, he isn't ignoring you; he's surrendering.

Why does my cat interrupt my phone calls?
He isn't jealous - he doesn't have any idea that you are speaking to someone else. He thinks you are talking to him.

Why do cats go to the one person in the room who doesn't like cats?
When a cat enters a room full of people who are staring at him, he becomes very uncomfortable. Then he notices that one person is totally ignoring him - the person who dislikes cats for whatever reason. The cat goes to that person to seek a safe haven from those who are fawning over him or intimidating him.

Why are cats so curious?
By nature, the cat is an explorer and is constantly on the hunt - not always for food, but also to satisfy his quest for the unknown.

Do cats dream?
As do humans, cats alternate phases of deep and light sleep. Dreaming occurs during the deep sleep phase. During a cat's deep-sleep phase the give-away is movement of his paws and claws, twitching of his whiskers, and flicking his ears. Sometimes he vocalizes.

Why do cats' tails quiver?
When a cat's tail is quivering, it can mean mild irritation. If erect and the whole length seems to be quivering with excitement, it means exactly that - excitement.

Why do cats swish their tails?
One reason is to get his balance before leaping. The other is to mesmerize the prey he is looking at. Since the cat can't see prey if the prey becomes still, he moves his tail to initiate the slightest movement in his target, which he can then spot.

What does it mean when a cat
lashes his tail from side to side?

The tail waving quietly from side to side means contentment. If the cat is sitting quietly with his tail gently wagging back and forth, he's concentrating intently on something. Vigorous lashing back and forth is of anger. It signals annoyance and a good sign that the cat is upset. Tail wagging somewhere in between heavy duty and half-hearted can mean that he is indecisive.

What else does a cat's tail tell?
When the tail is bent forward over the head, it means the cat is feeling like top cat. When it's waved quietly side to side like a lady's fan, the cat is contented. Several quick flicks upward is a greeting to both humans and other cats.

More WHY DO CATS ... ?? to come in the future.
Information from

http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/whydo.html

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RE:Cat Info
(Date Posted:01/05/2018 11:08 PM)


Diseases that Target Older Cats
By
Franny Syufy, About.com


Older cats are subject to many of the same diseases that affect humans more often after a certain age. Diabetes, kidney disease, heart problems and cancer number among the more serious diseases that can strike the elderly cat. On the plus side, many of these conditions can be treated successfully, and your cat can continue to live a relatively normal life.

Diabetes
Feline Diabetes Mellitus presents as one of two types: Type 1, caused by the insufficient production of insulin, and Type 2, related to the body's cells inability to handle insulin efficiently. Although diabetes can strike cats of any age, it is more prevalent in older, obese cats, and is found more often in male cats.

Warning Signs:

  • Excessive thirst and urination
  • Loss of weight due to the body's inability to handle glucose
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weakness
  • Poor skin and coat condition
  • breathing abnormalities
  • Dehydration

Treatment and Management:

  • Diet and Weight Control
  • A diet high in fiber and complex carbohydrates is recommended for obese diabetic cats, not only for the purpose of weight reduction, but to help control blood glucose levels. Your veterinarian can recommend the best form of diet for your cat, taking into consideration any other physical problems.
  • Insulin by injection
    Ideally, your veterinarian will conduct and 18-24 hour blood glucose profile to determine the amount and frequency of insulin injections. This test is done in hospital, and consists of injections of insulin followed by close monitoring of the blood glucose values.
  • Oral Medications
    A diabetic cat in otherwise good health may be treated sucessfully using an oral hypoglycemic medication.
  • Careful Monitoring
  • of glucose and insulin levels. An overdose of insulin can create hypoclycemia, a potentially fatal condition. Symptoms are lethargy, weakness, followed by incoordination, convulsions, and coma. This condition can be counteracted by giving the cat its normal food if it is able to eat, or a bit of Karo syrup rubbed on the gums, followed, of course, by a trip to the veterinarian.
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