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Welcome to Road to Recovery
Today
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 06/18/2018 07:01 AM

    Therefore, we started upon a personal inventory. This was Step Four. A business which takes no regular inventory usually goes broke. Taking a commercial inventory is a fact-finding and a fat-facing process. It is an effort to discover the truth about the stock-in-trade. One object is to disclose damaged or unsalable goods, to get rid of of them promptly and without regret. If the owner of the business is to be successful, he cannot fool himself with values.

    We did exactly the same thing with our lives. We took stock honestly. First, we searched out the flaws in our make-up which caused our failure. Being convinced that self, manifested in various ways, was what had defeated us, we considered its common manifestations.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, How It Works, pg. 64, with permission from AAWS

    Now for some people this was a scary step to take.  But did find that it was something that had to be done.  Some of spent weeks on it tying to do it right.  But trying to do it right the first time is not important, you can always go back in revise it and add things that you may have forgotten.  The important thing is that you have started it.

    Topic:  Was coming to the Fourth Step a frightening experience to you. And when you finished how much of a help was it doing it?

    Have a good meeting. 
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 06/10/2018 18:12 PM

    We are now at Step Three. Many of us said to our Maker, as we understood him: "God, I offer myself to thee---to build with me and to do with me as Thou wilt. Relieve me of the bondage of self, that I may better do Thy will. Take away my difficulties, that victory over them may bear witness to those I would help of Thy Power, Thy Love, and Thy Way of life. May I do Thy will always!" We thought well before taking this step making sure we were ready; that we could at last abandon ourselves utterly to Him.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, How It Works, pg. 63, with permission from AAWS

    Topic: Did it take long for you believe that prayer.

    Have a good meeting.
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 06/04/2018 05:29 AM

    Established on such a footing we became less and less interested in ourselves, our little plans and designs. More and more we became interested in seeing what we could contribute to life. As we felt new power flow in, as we enjoyed peace of mind, as we discovered we could face life successfully, as we became conscious of His presence, we began to lose our fear of today, tomorrow or the hereafter. We were reborn.

    Alcohols Anonymous, 4th Edition, How It Works, pg. 63, with permission from AAWS

    So far in this BBS we have gone through Step One and Two. Sorry that I didn't inform you on what step the topics were coming from.  From now on I will try to remember which step the topic is coming from.

    Topic: At the end of the paragraph we see these three words, "We were reborn."  What do these three words mean to you?

    Have a good meeting. 
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 05/27/2018 19:18 PM

    Selfishness---self-centeredness! That we think, is the root of our troubles. Driven by a hundred forms of fear, self-delusion, self-seeking, and self-pity, we step on the toes of our fellows and they retaliate. Sometimes they hurt us, seemingly without provocation, but we invariably find that at some time in the past we have made decisions based on self which later placed us in a position to be hurt.

    So our troubles, we think, are basically of our own making. They arise out of ourselves, and the alcoholic is an extreme example of self-will run riot, though he usually doesn't think so. Above everything, we alcoholics must be rid of this selfishness. We must, or it kills us! God makes that possible. And there often seems no way of entirely getting rid of self without His aid. Many of us had moral and philosophical convictions galore, but we could not live up to them even though we would have liked to. Neither could we reduce our self-centeredness much by wishing or trying on our own power. We had to have God's help.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, How It Works, pg. 62, with permission from AAWS

    Topic: How would you describe moving out of selfishness to be humble?

    Have a good meeting. 
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 05/21/2018 07:32 AM

    The first requirement is that we be convinced that any life run on self-will can hardly be a success. On that basis we are almost always in collision with something or somebody, even though our motives are good. Most people try to live by self-propulsion. Each person is like an actor who wants to run the whole show; is forever trying to arrange the lights, the ballet, the scenery and the rest of the players in his own way. If his arrangements would only stay put, if only people would do as he wished, the show would be great. Everybody, including himself, would be pleased. Life would be wonderful. In trying to make these arrangements our actor may sometimes be quite virtuous. He may be kind, considerate, patient, generous; even modest and self-sacrificing. On the other hand, he may be mean, egotistical, selfish and dishonest. But, as with most humans, he is more likely to have varied traits.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, How It Works, Pgs 60-61, with permission from AAWS

    Topic: The first sentence in this reading says: "The first requirement is that we be convinced that any life run on self-will can hardly be a success."  So how long did it take you to realize that your self-will just wasn't working?

    Have a good meeting. 
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 05/14/2018 07:38 AM

    Actually we were fooling ourselves, for deep down in every man, woman, and child, is the fundamental idea of God.  It may be obscured by calamity, by pump, by worship other things, but in some form or other it is there. For faith in a Power greater than ourselves, and miraculous demonstrations of the power in human lives, are facts as old as man himself.
    We finally saw that faith in some kind of God was a part of our make-up, just as much as the feeling we have for a friend. Sometimes we had to search fearlessly, but He was there. He was as much a fact as were. We found the Great Reality deep down within us. In the last analysis it is only there that He may be found. It was so with us.

    We can only clear the ground a bit. If our testimony helps sweep away prejudice, enables you to think honestly, encourages you to search diligently within yourself, then if you wish, you can join us on the Broad Highway. With this attitude you cannot fail. The consciousness of your belief is sure to come to you.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, We Agnostics, pg. 55, with permission from AAWS

    Topic: What encourage you to take the Broad Highway?

    Have a good meeting,
    John Begin
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 05/06/2018 18:45 PM

    When we saw others solve their problems by a simple reliance upon the Spirit of the Universe, we had to stop doubting the power of God. Our ideas did not work. But the God idea did.
    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, We Agnostics, pg. 52, with permission from AAWS.

    Topic: How did you feel when your idea wasn't working?

    Have a good meeting.

    John Begin
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 04/29/2018 19:01 PM

    Faced with alcoholic destruction, we soon became as open minded on spiritual matters as we had tried to be on other questions. In this respect alcohol was a great persuader. It finally beat us into a state of reasonableness.  Sometimes this was a tedious process; we hope no one else will be prejudiced for as long as some of were.
    Topic:  If or when did you become open minded on spiritual matters?

    Have a good meeting,
    John Begin
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the week 04/23/2018 07:47 AM

    Much of our relief, we discover we did not need to consider another's conception of God. Our own conception, however inadequate, was sufficient to make the approach and to effect to contact with Him. As soon as we admitted the possible existence of a Creative Intelligence, a Spirit of the Universe under-lying the totality of things, we began to possessed a new sense of power and direction, provided we too other simple steps. We found that God does not make too hard terms with those who seek Him. To us, the Realm of Spirit is broad, roomy, all inclusive; never exclusive for forbidding to those who earnestly seek. It is open, we believe, to all men.
    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, We Agnostics, pg. 46, with permission from AAWS

    Topic:  What conception of God did you choose?

    Have a good meeting,
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the week 04/23/2018 07:47 AM

    Much of our relief, we discover we did not need to consider another's conception of God. Our own conception, however inadequate, was sufficient to make the approach and to effect to contact with Him. As soon as we admitted the possible existence of a Creative Intelligence, a Spirit of the Universe under-lying the totality of things, we began to possessed a new sense of power and direction, provided we too other simple steps. We found that God does not make too hard terms with those who seek Him. To us, the Realm of Spirit is broad, roomy, all inclusive; never exclusive for forbidding to those who earnestly seek. It is open, we believe, to all men.
    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, We Agnostics, pg. 46, with permission from AAWS

    Topic:  What conception of God did you choose?

    Have a good meeting,
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 04/16/2018 07:09 AM

    Most of us think this awareness of a Power greater than ourselves is the essence of spiritual experience. Our More religious members call it "God-consciousness."
    Most emphatically we wish to say that any alcoholic capable of honestly facing his problems in the light of our experience can recover, provided he does not close his mind to all spiritual concepts. He can only be defeated by an attitude of intolerance or belligerent denial.

    We find that no one need have difficulty with the spirituality of the program. Willingness, honesty and open mindedness are the essentials of recovery. But these are indispensable.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, Spiritual Experience, pg. 568, with permission from AAWS

    Topic:  How important is it that we need to be honest with ourselves?

    Have a good meeting.
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Topic for the Week 04/16/2018 07:09 AM

    Most of us think this awareness of a Power greater than ourselves is the essence of spiritual experience. Our More religious members call it "God-consciousness."
    Most emphatically we wish to say that any alcoholic capable of honestly facing his problems in the light of our experience can recover, provided he does not close his mind to all spiritual concepts. He can only be defeated by an attitude of intolerance or belligerent denial.

    We find that no one need have difficulty with the spirituality of the program. Willingness, honesty and open mindedness are the essentials of recovery. But these are indispensable.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, Spiritual Experience, pg. 568, with permission from AAWS

    Topic:  How important is it that we need to be honest with ourselves?

    Have a good meeting.
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Open Readings 02/24/2018 07:59 AM

    How It Works

    Rarely have we seen a person fail who has throughly followed our path. Those who do not recover are people who cannot or will not completely give themselves to his simple program, usually men and women who are contitutionally incapable of being honest with themselves. There are such unfortunates. They are not at fault; they seem to have been born that way. They are naturally incapable of grasping and developing a manner of living which demands regorous honesty. Their chances are less than average. There are those, too, who suffer from grave emotional mental disorders, but many of them do recover if they have the capacity to be honest.

    Our stories disclose in a general way what we used to be like, what happend, and what we are like now. If you have decided you want what we have and are willing to go to any length to get it---then you are ready to take certain steps.

    As some of these we balked. We thought we could find an easier, softer way. But we could not. With all the earnestness at our command, we beg of you to be fearless and thorough from the very start. Some of us have tried to hold on to our old ideas and the result was nil until we let go absolutely.

    Remember that we deal with alcohol---cunning, baffling, powerful! Without help it is too much for us. But there is One who has all power---that One is God. May you find Him now!

    Half measures availed us nothing. We stood at the turning point. We asked His protection and care with complete abandon.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, How It Works, pgs 58-59, 4th Edition.

    Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as a program of recovery:

    1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol---that our lives had become unmanageable.

    2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

    3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

    4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

    5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

    6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

    7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

    8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

    9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

    10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

    11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

    12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

    Many of us exclaimed, "What an order! I can't go through with it." Do not be discouraged. No one among us has been able to maintain anything like perfect adherence to theses principles. We are not saints. The point is, that we are willing to grow along spiritual lines. The principles we have set down are guides to progress. We claim spiritual progress rather than spiritual perfection.

    Our description of the alcoholic, the chapter to the agnostic, and our personal adventures before and after make clear three pertinent ideas:

    (a) That we were alcoholic and could not manage our own lives.

    (b) That probably no human power could have relieved our alcoholism.

    (c) That God could and would if He were sought.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, How It Works, pgs. 59-60



    The Twelve Traditions

    1. Our common welfare should come first: personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.

    2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority--a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

    3. The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.

    4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole.

    5. Each group has but on primary purpose--to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

    6. An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.

    7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

    8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

    9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsibile to those they serve.

    10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.

    11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio and films.

    12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 3rd Edition, The Twelve Traditions, pg. 564

    The Promises

    If we are painstaking about this phase of our development, we will be amazed before we are half way through. We are going to know a new freedom and a new happiness. We will not regret the past nor wish to shut the door on it. We will comprehend the word serentiy and we will know peace. No matter how far down the scale we have gone, we will see how our experience can benefit others. That feeling of uselessness and self-pity will disappear. We will lose interest in selfish things and gain interest in our fellows. Self-seeking will slip away. Our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change. Fear of people and of economic insecurity will leave us. We will intuitively know how to handle situations which used to baffle usd. We will suddenly realize that God is doing for us what we could not do for ourselves.

    Are these extravagant promises? We think not. They are being fulfilled among us---sometimers quickly, sometimes slowly. They will always materialize if we work for them..

    Alcoholics Anonymous, 4th Edition, Into Action, pgs. 83-84
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic A Path To Faith 02/07/2018 07:53 AM

    Daily Reflections

    A PATH TO FAITH

    True humility and an open mind can lead us to faith, and every A.A. meeting is an assurance that God will restore us to sanity if we rightly relate ourselves to Him.

    TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 33

    My last drunk had landed me in the hospital, totally broken. It was then that I was able to see my past float in front of me. I realized that, through drinking, I had lived every nightmare I had ever had. My own self-will and obsession to drink had driven me into a dark pit of hallucinations, blackouts and despair. Finally beaten, I asked for God's help. His presence told me to believe. My obsession for alcohol was taken away and my paranoia has since been lifted. I am no longer afraid. I know my life is healthy and sane.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections, p. 46, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic A Glorious Release 02/05/2018 11:17 AM

    Daily Reflections

    A GLORIOUS RELEASE

    "The minute I stopped arguing, I could begin to see and feel. Right there, Step Two gently and very gradually began to infiltrate my life. I can't say upon what occasion or upon what day I came to believe in a Power greater than myself, but I certainly have that belief now. To acquire it, I had only to stop fighting and practice the rest of A.A.'s program as enthusiastically as I could. "

    TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 27

    After years of indulging in a "self-will run riot," Step Two became for me a glorious release from being all alone. Nothing is so painful or insurmountable in my journey now. Someone is always there to share life's burdens with me. Step Two became a reinforcement with God, and I now realize that my insanity and ego were curiously linked. To rid myself of the former, I must give up the latter to one with far broader shoulders than my own.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections p. 44, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Rescued By Surrendering 02/02/2018 08:56 AM

    Daily Reflections

    RESCUED BY SURRENDERING

    Characteristic of the so-called typical alcoholic is a narcissistic egocentric core, dominated by feelings of omnipotence, intent on maintaining at all costs its inner integrity. . . . Inwardly the alcoholic brooks no control from man or God. He, the alcoholic, is and must be the master of his destiny. He will fight to the end to preserve that position.

    A.A. COMES OF AGE, p. 311

    The great mystery is: "Why do some of us die alcoholic deaths, fighting to preserve the 'independence' of our ego, while others seem to sober up effortlessly in A.A.?" Help from a Higher Power, the gift of sobriety, came to me when an otherwise unexplained desire to stop drinking coincided with my willingness to accept the suggestions of the men and women of A.A. I had to surrender, for only by reaching out to God and my fellows could I be rescued.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections, p. 41, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Goal: Samity 02/01/2018 08:17 AM

    Daily Reflections

    GOAL: SANITY

    ". . . Step Two gently and very gradually began to infiltrate my life. I can't say upon what occasion or upon what day I came to believe in a Power greater than myself, but I certainly have that belief now."

    TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 27

    "Came to believe!" I gave lip service to my belief when I felt like it or when I thought it would look good. I didn't really trust God. I didn't believe He cared for me. I kept trying to change things I couldn't change. Gradually, in disgust, I began to turn it all over, saying: "You're so omnipotent, you take care of it." He did. I began to receive answers to my deepest problems, sometimes at the most unusual times: driving to work, eating lunch, or when I was sound asleep. I realized that I hadn't thought of those solutions -- a Power greater than myself had given them to me. I came to believe.

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections, p. 40, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic Our Common Welfare Comes First 01/31/2018 10:01 AM

    Daily Reflections

    OUR COMMON WELFARE COMES FIRST 

    The unity of Alcoholics Anonymous is the most cherished quality our Society has. . . . We stay whole, or A.A. dies. 

    TWELVE STEPS AND TWELVE TRADITIONS, p. 129 

    Our Traditions are key elements in the ego deflation process necessary to achieve and maintain sobriety in Alcoholics Anonymous. The First Tradition reminds me not to take credit, or authority, for my recovery. Placing our common welfare first reminds me not to become a healer in this program; I am still one of the patients. Self-effacing elders built the ward. Without it, I doubt I would be alive. Without the group, few alcoholics would recover. 

    The active role in renewed surrender of will enables me to step aside from the need to dominate, the desire for recognition, both of which played so great a part in my active alcoholism. Deferring my personal desires for the greater good of group growth contributes toward A.A. unity that is central to all recovery. It helps me to remember that the whole is greater than the sum of all its parts. 

    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections, p. 39, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic The Joy Of Sharing 01/29/2018 07:51 AM

    Daily Reflections

    THE JOY OF SHARING 

    Life will take on new meaning. To watch people recover, to see them help others, to watch loneliness vanish, to see a fellowship grow up about you, to have a host of friends -- this is an experience you must not miss. We know you will not want to miss it. Frequent contact with newcomers and with each other is the bright spot of our lives. 

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 89 

    To know that each newcomer with whom I share has the opportunity to experience the relief that I have found in this Fellowship fills me with joy and gratitude. I feel that all the things described in A.A. will come to pass for them, as they have for me, if they seize the opportunity and embrace the program fully. 


    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Readings, p. 39, with permission from AAWS
  • JohnTBegin JohnTBe
  • Topic The Treasure Of The Past 01/28/2018 08:15 AM

    Daily Reflections

    THE TREASURE OF THE PAST 

    Showing others who suffer how we were given help is the very thing which makes life seem so worth while to us now. Cling to the thought that, in God's hands, the dark past is the greatest possession you have -- the key to life and happiness for others. With it you can avert death and misery for them. 

    ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, p. 124 

    What a gift it is for me to realize that all those seemingly useless years were not wasted. The most degrading and humiliating experiences turn out to be the most powerful tools in helping others to recover. In knowing the depths of shame and despair, I can reach out with a loving and compassionate hand, and know that the grace of God is available to me. 


    Alcoholics Anonymous, Daily Reflections, p. 38, with permission from AAWS
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