http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm173/Busybj_2008/HISTORYICON.jpg
Today | Join | Member | Search | Who's On | Chat Room | Help | Shop | Sign In | | | | | Follow Aimoo_Com on Twitter
Make a donation click here. Your support will help us remove ads and upload local images, etc.
Title: FLEMISH WEAVERS
WorldOfHistory   People
Hop to: 
Views:1189     
New Topic New Poll
<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
AuthorComment
merlinuk
 Author    



Rank:Platinum Member

Score: 247
Posts: 247
From: United Kingdom
Registered: 21-05-2009
Time spent: 6388 hours

(Date Posted:21-09-2009 08:06)
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo

smiley3its me at last out and about, a littel information on the Weavers.

FLEMISH AND DUTCH WEAVERD

‘All the cloth workers of strange lands, of whatsoever country they be, which will come to England…shall come safely and securely, and shall be in the King’s protection and safe conduct, to dwell in the same lands choosing where they will.’

Proclamation of Edward III, 1337

The most numerous overseas immigrants in medieval London were craft workers from the Low Countries.

Flemish weavers were encouraged to settle from the 14th century by Edward III to help develop the weaving industry. Weavers Lane in Southwark gained its name from these residents.

Later, Flemish silk weavers practised in Cripplegate. Tax records from 1440 show the largest group of 'aliens’ were 'Doche', a term which included people from modern day Holland, Germany and Belgium.

Background
In the early 1300's Edward I put a tax on the export of wool, which was one of England’s largest exports of the time. In 1331 Edward III decided that as most of the exports were going to the continent to be turned into cloth, it would be good to import some weavers from Flanders. The weavers mostly from Ghent were keen to come to England as their raw materials would be cheaper.
Time of Riches
Cloth making had been practiced in the Kent are since Roman times, but the material produced was of poor quality, not very well woven, and required shrinking.

The weaving process started by the weavers producing the cloth, then the cloth was scoured in a trough of water with a wooden scraper. The cleaned cloth was then stretched on wooden racks to dry, these racks were known as tenters, the iron hooks which held the cloth known as the tenter-hooks (hanging on tenter-hooks is an expression meaning in a state of suspense). After drying the cloth was rubbed over with fullers earth, a great deal of which is found in the area, then folded and hammered by a water powered heavy wooden hammer, which gave the cloth a smooth, non greasy surface. After this the cloth was stretched again.


This high quality cloth was in great demand and brought wealth to those villages associated with the industry. Just take a look at the village of Biddenden and its row of weavers houses, to see some of the wealth created.

The Flemish weavers settled in
Tenterden , Biddenden , Cranbrook and Staplehurst , and brought with them the techniques of fine weaving, and of fulling to finish the cloth.
The End of an Era
During the next 200+ years the cloth was created, and the majority exported into Europe, however this was due to stop in Elizabeth I's reign.

In 1566 an Act of Parliament was passed which prohibited the export of unfinished cloths, this was intended to create work and wealth in the clothing manufacturing industry. Most of the Wealden Broadcloth industry was centred around exporting, with only a few local markets. This banning of the export trade basically killed off the industry that brought great riches to the area. Although the industry continued and took about 100 years to finally die, its time was over, and this Act signalled the end of an era.

In the very early days of the Flemish weavers coming to England there was some local problems at the Flemings taking Englaish jobs but very soon the English weavers found that by following the Flemings prosperity was on the move.

Dutch and Flemish London

The Dutch had significant influence in London from the 15th to the 17th centuries. Many of the city’s medieval craft workers were from Holland and Belgium. When England became a Protestant country , religious refugees arrived from the Spanish Netherlands. the Dutch and Flemings developed the weaving, brewing and ceramics industries. 17th century Dutch artists painted famous views of London, while Prince William of Orange in Holland became King of England.

After Henry VIII broke off relations with the Catholic Church in 1534, England became a haven for Protestants being persecuted throughout Europe.

Flemish and Walloon refugees from the Spanish Netherlands flocked to east London during the last 30 years of the 16th century. The Dutch Church still occupies the same site in Austin Friars in the City that was granted to the community in 1550.

The 16th century saw the Dutch in East Anglia developing ‘New Draperies’, a light soft cloth which outdid heavy English woollen textiles. Meanwhile the Dutch in London dyed and finished this cloth. Cornelis Drebbel discovered how to create a brilliant scarlet dye and set up a dye-works at Bow.

The London brewing industry was more or less run by the Dutch, whose word ‘brewery’ replaced the English term ‘brewhouse’. Potters Field indicates the place where Dutch potters brought new ceramics technology to Southwark. Dutch engravers and mapmakers monopolised the production of high quality views of London.

They also made important contributions to goldsmithing, the leather trades, clock-making, printing, spectacle-making, tailoring and brickmaking. Not able to join city guilds at the highest levels, the immigrants set up their own businesses in the suburbs. Women earned their living by doing laundry, spinning and in domestic service.

Dutch influences on English art and design were strong during the reign of Charles II, who spent part of his life exiled in Holland.

Dutch craftsmen seeking refuge in England at the end of the 17th century brought with them the furniture-making techniques of veneering, marquetry and japanning. The painters Van Dyck and Lely were the most famous of the many Dutch artists resident in London.

Dutch financiers invested considerable capital in England and the Dutch played a leading part in the development of London as a financial centre. John Houblon, a Walloon, was first governor of the Bank of England founded in 1649.

Malcolm
usertype:1
wwwcof
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 1# 



Rank:Golden Member

Score:137
Posts:137
From: Canada
Registered:29-01-2009
Time spent: 0 hours

RE:FLEMISH WEAVERS
(Date Posted:22-09-2009 00:19)

Malcolm, most enjoyable as always.  Did I mention that my son in law is Dutch?

Sharon
usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
"Practice makes perfect -- so be careful what you practice!"

Support us

Create free forum and click the links below and your donations will make a difference here.

www.dinodirect.com

A Huge Online Store for Various Cool Gadgets, Accessories: Laser Pointer, Bluetooth Headset, Cell Phone Jammer, MP3 Players, Spy Cameras, Soccer Jersey, Window Curtains, MP4 Player, E Cigarette, Wedding Dresses, Hearing Aids, eBook Reader, Tattoo Machines, LED Light Bulbs, Bluetooth Stereo Headset, Holiday Gifts, Security Camera and Games Accessories and Hobby Gadgets.  
merlinuk
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 2# 



Rank:Platinum Member

Score:247
Posts:247
From: United Kingdom
Registered:21-05-2009
Time spent: 6388 hours

RE:FLEMISH WEAVERS
(Date Posted:22-09-2009 01:43)

smiley3Good to know you enjoyed the Post Sharon, yes I do believef you did say your S-L was Dutch, if he is a protestant then he will be an orangeman, but hten with hte Dutch there are many variations Protestant and then Lutheran, and so on, if memeory serves Holland has been Protestant since they managed to  through out te Spanish.
Malcolm 
usertype:1 tt= 0
wwwcof
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 3# 



Rank:Golden Member

Score:137
Posts:137
From: Canada
Registered:29-01-2009
Time spent: 0 hours

RE:FLEMISH WEAVERS
(Date Posted:22-09-2009 16:03)

Long story .... one day I will fill you in .... currently he is not attending church of any kind.

Sharon
usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
"Practice makes perfect -- so be careful what you practice!"

merlinuk
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 4# 



Rank:Platinum Member

Score:247
Posts:247
From: United Kingdom
Registered:21-05-2009
Time spent: 6388 hours

RE:FLEMISH WEAVERS
(Date Posted:23-09-2009 02:53)

smiley2 Good day from the UK Sharon, long stories are generally involved so as and when, however many of us have problems both with faith and also were we worship and howwe worship, but for me as long as God is in our hearts we can deal with the every day part as and when we can.
Love Malcolm
usertype:1 tt= 0
wwwcof
Share to: Facebook Twitter MSN linkedin google yahoo 5# 



Rank:Golden Member

Score:137
Posts:137
From: Canada
Registered:29-01-2009
Time spent: 0 hours

RE:FLEMISH WEAVERS
(Date Posted:23-09-2009 08:20)

Yes, I have been taught that challenges are part of God’s plan and I believe that with patience, faith, and determination, we sould be able to handle the challenges we face.  Mind you on occassion I must admit I have had some trouble believing this.  Apparently, in order to test our use of our God-given agency, we undergo a series of changes, challenges, trials, and temptations as we proceed through life.  If we do not experience sorrow we would not completely appreciate joy.

Jesus Christ has suffered the pains and afflictions of all mankind, so I agree, we can be comforted and healed as we pray to the Father in His name and rely upon His Atonement.

Off topic ever so slightly .... There is a wise saying in French: Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose, which means, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

Sharon

usertype:1 tt= 0

--------------------------------------------------------------
"Practice makes perfect -- so be careful what you practice!"

<<Previous ThreadNext Thread>>
Page 1 / 1    
New Topic New Poll
Sign Up | Create | About Us | SiteMap | Features | Forums | Show Off | Faq | Help
Copyright © 2000-2014 Aimoo Free Forum All rights reserved.

Get cheapest China Wholesale,  China Wholesale Supplier,  to be a retailer is easy now.
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY
LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY LUFFY