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disabledke
Topic :   Useful Links

No automatic alt text available.
Any disabled or health links here no others to Disabled Support Group UK
June 14

Any disabled or health links here no others
2 mins
Online References

This will be an ongoing list of helpful links.

Just remember ...not "every body" is the same.

We are all individuals and have different factors in what will or won't work for us.

Please use caution and common sense.

Thank you, from the management

Online References

This will be an ongoing list of helpful links.

Just remember ...not "every body" is the same.

We are all individuals and have different factors in what will or won't work for us.

Please use caution and common sense.

Thank you, from the management

Medical Dictionary Online
http://www.online-medical-dictionary.org/
WebMD - Check for symptoms right now
http://symptoms.webmd.com/
National Fibromyalgia Association
http://www.fmaware.org/site/PageServer
National Arthritis Foundation
http://www.arthritis.org.sg/

National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society
http://www.nass.co.uk/
Post Traumatic Fibromyalgia Syndrome
http://www.immunesupport.com
National Stroke Association (American)
http://www.stroke.org/site/PageNavigator/HOME
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stokes
http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/epilepsy/epilepsy.htm

Web Pages that I feel can be usefull.

Please check them out by clicking on the links below!

Access and Mobility

http://www.accesscode.info/index.htm

Access for all
Housing
Employment, local services and community facilities
External environment and transport
Access and tourism
Access to the countryside
Access to Education
Direct Govenment: Just click on one of the two lines below and will take you straight to web site.

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/index.htm

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/index.htm

Department for transport: This is a fantastic website it offers you all information from legal government access to transport, all access issues, such as public high ways, access to buildings, etc. Also this is a link to get travel information for any type of public transport, from buses to planes! If you are intrested in access issues or transport issues or want to check up on transport information click below and experience this great website!

http://www.dft.gov.uk/transportforyou/access/

Department for Work and Pensions

All Information you need regarding Services and Benefits, Advicers and Professinals & Employers. Just click on to the logo and will take you straight to the web site, check it out, its all the information you may need!

These are new websites that I have discovered that is worth having a look! Please click on any of the links below!
http://www.arthritiscare.org.uk/Home
http://www.arthritis.org/
http://www.arc.org.uk/
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/diseases/facts/arthritis.htm
http://sciencedaily.healthology.com/…/pain-…/article1619.htm
http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/hp.asp
http://ww2.arthritis.org/AFStore/StartRead.asp
http://www.pain.com/
http://www.revolutionhealth.com/…/…/knee-pain/knee-problems…
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6956953.stm
http://arthritis.webmd.com/
http://www.medicinenet.com/arthritis/article.htm
http://www.homehealth-uk.com/medical/arthritis.htm
The list below relate to neck & back pain & fibromyalgia
http://treatmentheadache.com/
http://www.medicinenet.com/neck_pain/article.htm
http://www.spineuniverse.com/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neck_pain
Gay related websites
http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/articles/2005-3119.html

http://www.pinknews.co.uk/news/articles/2005-3007.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/…/commun…/gay_disabled_mens_group.shtml

http://www.topiccraze.com/t/Gay-Disabled

http://www.topiccraze.com/rw

http://www.outsiders.org.uk/leaflets/disabled-and-homosexual

http://www.gmfa.org.uk/theguide/special-interests/disability

This is a good website to links to different disabled gay websites:

http://www.deafgateway.info/home/categories/49

http://www.radar.org.uk/radarwebsite/

http://www.bcodp.org.uk/

http://www.find-zone.net/index.html

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/DisabledPeople/index.htm

http://www.patient.co.uk/showdoc/26738740/#header

Back Pain

http://backandneckpain.blogspot.com/

Aloeveradetails

http://aloeveradetails.blogspot.com/

Access For Disabled People

http://www.wealden.gov.uk/Planning_and_Buil…/…/disabled.aspx



07/24/2018 23:06 PM


disabledke
Topic :   My Ankylosing Spondylitis

Image may contain: shoes

My Ankylosing Spondylitis.


Doctor believes I have AS due to the fusion of my right sacroiliac joint.

Diagnosed 01/12/2014. Recommended to use Voltaren Diclofenac Diethylamine Emulgel 



Problems leading up to diagnosis:

Pain in right hip and back pain; pain level increased slowly over a few weeks

Hip pain got so severe I couldn’t move, even staying still hurt

Back pain also increased to a severe level and experienced a throbbing sensation all night

Other symptoms possibly related to AS:

Painful heels; this doesn’t happen often – normally if I walk or stand in one position for too long. A 

gel cushion in my shoes has helped.

Thumb pain on right hand; sometimes includes little finger. Wrist and thumb support bandage helps

ease the discomfort.

Constant hip ache which sometimes turns to pain. Eases when I use….. gel

Uncomfortable knees – normally occurs when sitting with feet up, legs outstretched. Helps with hip

but causes discomfort in the knees. 

Upper back below neck constantly aching. Haven’t found anything that eases this.



Left Hip History:


Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis – 

Had problems with hip up to a year before diagnosis

Emergency operation in 1998

In wheelchair for nearly 6 months after operation

On crutches for a further year, before being able to walk normally

2 years later – operation to remove screws

http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/slipped-capital-femoral-epiphysis-pro 

Left hip trochanteric osteotomy femoral osteochondroplasty with debridement of femoral head and

laberal repair –

Had hip pain and could feel my hip rubbing and could hear a clicking sound

Operation in October 2010

On crutches for up to a year – started with both for the first few months then with physiotherapy

reduced to one crutch to finally none


07/24/2018 18:26 PM


disabledke
Topic :   Dentist

NHS dental services explained

How to find an NHS dentist

Everyone should be able to access good-quality NHS dental services.

There is no need to register with a dentist in the same way as with a GP because you are not bound to a catchment area.

Simply find a dental practice that's convenient for you, whether it's near your home or work, and phone them to see if there are any appointments available. 

If you do not have a regular dental practice or are new to the area, you can search for an NHS dentist near you on this site.

Dental practices won't always have the capacity to take on new NHS patients – you may have to join a waiting list, look for a different dentist who is taking on new NHS patients, or be seen privately. 

Once you find a dental practice, you may have to fill in a registration form at your first visit, which is purely to add you to their patient database. However, that does not mean you have guaranteed access to an NHS dental appointment in the future.

Problems finding an NHS dentist

If after contacting several dental practices you still can't find a dentist accepting NHS patients, you should call NHS England's Customer Contact Centre on 0300 311 2233.

NHS England commissions dental services in England and is required to meet the needs of their local population for both urgent and routine dental care. 

Your local Healthwatch also may be able to give you information about services in your area.

If NHS England has been unable to help you find a dentist and you want to raise your concerns about this, contact them on: 

If you're still not satisfied with NHS England's response, you can take your complaint to the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman

Dental emergency and out-of-hours care

If you think you need urgent care, contact your usual dentist as some practices offer emergency dental slots and will provide care if clinically necessary.

You can also call NHS 111, who can put you in touch with an urgent dental service.

Do not contact your GP, as they will not be able to offer urgent or emergency dental care.

When to go to A&E

Only visit A&E in serious circumstances, such as:

  • severe pain
  • heavy bleeding
  • injuries to the face, mouth or teeth 

If you're not sure whether you should go to A&E, contact NHS 111, who will be able to advise you. Find out when to dial 999.

How much will I be charged?

The emergency dentist will only deal with the problem at hand and provide clinically necessary treatment to stop any pain. An urgent dental treatment will always be charged at Band 1 (£21.60) – see NHS dental charges explained.

If you are entitled to free NHS dental care, you should be able to claim back the cost of any treatment. Ensure you keep all receipts. For more information, see Help with dental costs.

If you are asked to come back for further treatment, this will be considered to be a separate course of non-urgent treatment. You will have to pay the relevant charge for the new course of treatment.

Ask the dentist what the treatment will cost or whether you can have a treatment plan.

Page last reviewed: 28/12/2016

Next review due: 28/12/2019



07/20/2018 07:29 AM


disabledke
Topic :   Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

What is Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?

Vertigo is a very specific kind of dizziness: the feeling that you’re going around and around or that the inside of your head is spinning. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of this condition.

Each part of the name describes a key part of the inner-ear disorder:

  • Benign means it’s not very serious. Your life is not in danger.
  • Paroxysmal means that it hits suddenly and lasts a short time.
  • Positional means you trigger the vertigo with certain postures or movements.

It's common, and usually can be treated in a doctor’s office.

In rare cases, the problem can be serious if it increases your chances of falling. If you get these attacks often, it could point to other medical conditions. They’re often hard to diagnose, though.

What Causes BPPV?

Inside your ear are tiny crystals of calcium carbonate. You might think of them as “ear rocks.” They’re also called “otoconia.”

Sometimes the crystals come loose from their normal spot in your ear and move to other areas, including the canals in your ears that sense your head’s rotation. Once there, they can clump together.

Because the clump is heavy compared with other things in your ear, it will sink to the lowest part of your inner ear.

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When you turn or change position, the clump will cause the fluid in your inner ear to slosh around after you’ve stopped moving. That creates the sense that you’re moving even though you are still.

There are any number of ways you could trigger BPPV:

  • Rolling over in bed
  • Getting in and out of bed
  • Bending over
  • Tipping your head back
  • Quick head movements

If you move one of these ways and find yourself dizzy or it seems as though the room is spinning, you may have BPPV. Other symptoms include nauseavomiting, and losing your balance.

Usually, you can expect to have rhythmic eye movements when you get BPPV. Your doctor might call this “nystagmus,” and it’s what she’ll likely look for if she thinks you have vertigo.

Who Usually Gets It?

You’re more likely to get BPPV if you’re older. That’s because parts of the inner ear start to show wear and tear.

In many cases, it simply comes on without warning. In people younger than 50, head injury is the most common cause of BPPV.

Other causes include:

  • Having your head in the same position for a long time -- at the dentist’s office or the hairdresser, for instance
  • High-intensity aerobics
  • Riding a bike over rough trails
  • An inner-ear disorder such as Meniere’s disease
  • Being in the hospital or on bed rest at home for a long time
  • A certain type of migraine

When to Call Your Doctor

If you have dizziness off and on for more than a week, you should make an appointment with your doctor.

You may be able to figure out before your visit which ear is affected. Here’s how to do that:

  1. Sit on your bed so that your head will hang over the edge when you lie down.
  2. Turn your head to the right and lie down quickly.
  3. Wait 1 minute. If you feel dizzy, the right side is affected.
  4. If you don’t feel dizzy, sit up, wait a little bit and repeat the test with your left side.
  5. If you feel dizzy when you repeat the test, your left side is affected.

Call your doctor at once if you’re dizzy or:

  • A new or severe headache sets in.
  • You have a fever.
  • You’re seeing double or not at all.
  • It’s hard to talk.
  • You’re falling down or you can’t walk.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will ask questions about your general health and your symptoms.

She will also look for the telltale eye movement of nystagmus. She may ask you to lie on your back on a table with your head tilted back off it. This is to show whether you can control your eye movements.

Your doctor also will look to see if symptoms of dizziness happen when your eyes or head move in a certain direction, and if doing so makes you dizzy for less than a minute.

The doctor might also conduct a test using infrared goggles.

Treatments

Your doctor may be able to stop your BPPV with a treatment in the office that moves the loose crystals in your ear into a spot that will cause less trouble. To do this, sShe most likely will use the Epley maneuver. A less-common action -- at least in the U.S. -- is the Semont maneuver. Each one takes about 15 minutes.

You will have to rest in the office for about 10 minutes before you can go home to make sure you don’t have any quick episodes of vertigo as the crystals resettle.

You will need someone to drive you. Wear comfortable clothes so you can move easily.

Once you get home, you’ll need to follow specific instructions. These may include:

  • Sleeping with your head at a 45-degree angle -- either in a recliner or propped up on a sofa -- for 2 nights.
  • Keeping your head vertical for 2 days. You may have to avoid certain exercises and modify your movements during shaving and washing your hair.
  • For a week, you will need to avoid head movements that might bring on BPPV. You may need to sleep with two pillows and avoid sleeping on the affected side.

Surgery

In very rare cases, you might need surgery to cure the problem. It involves plugging part of your inner ear to prevent the small calcium crystals from moving in your ear canal.

Surgery carries a small chance of complications, including loss of hearing.

What Can I Do at Home?

Even after successful treatment for your BPPV, it can come back. However, you can come up with a plan at home to help keep future bouts at bay. You should:

  • Be aware of your chances of falling.
  • Sit down at once if you feel dizzy.
  • Use good lighting if you get up at night.

If your BPPV comes back, you can take steps to deal with your symptoms until you see a doctor. For instance, you can:

  • Avoid sleeping on the affected side.
  • Sleep with two or more pillows under your head.
  • When you wake in the morning, lift your head slowly and sit on the side of the bed for a moment before you stand up.
  • Avoid bending over to pick things up.

Your doctor may teach you a maneuver you can try at home to move the loose ear crystals back into a better place.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on November 12, 2016


07/17/2018 02:53 AM


disabledke
Topic :   Marijuana on the heart: It can cause problems

Not So Harmless? Pot Linked to

Heart Problems

  •  0
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Not So Harmless? Pot Linked to Heart Problems
Marijuana may be linked with heart problems, according to a new study.
Credit: Marijuana photo via Shutterstock

Pot may not have a

chilling-out, calming

effect on everyone

— evidence is

emerging that for

some people,

smoking marijuana

could increase the

risk of heart

problems, doctors

say.

In a new study, researchers used data from a

database called the French Addictovigilance

Network, gathered from 2006 to 2010. Of the

nearly 2,000 reported complications related to

marijuana, the researchers found that 2

percent, or 35 cases, involved heart problems. These

cases included 20 people who suffered a heart

attack, and nine who died.

Researchers found most patients were men,

with an average age of about 34. Regular

marijuana users with a family history of heart

disease had an increased risk of heart disease,

according to the study, published today (April 23)

in the Journal of the American Heart

Association.

Advertisement
 

Many of the patients also had other risk factors

for heart disease, such as smoking tobacco and

drinking alcohol, the researchers noted.

Nevertheless, nearly half of the patients were

regular users of only marijuana.

Researchers also found a small increase in

heart problems over time. In 2006, only 1.1

percent of the reported complications were

heart related, but that rate increased to 3.6

percent in 2010. [Marijuana: 5 Surprising Facts About Pot]

"The general public thinks marijuana is

harmless, but information revealing the 

potential health dangers of marijuana use needs

to be disseminated to the public, policymakers

and health care providers," said study

researcher Émilie Jouanjus, a medical faculty

member at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire

de Toulouse in France.

Considering 1.2 million people in France use

marijuana regularly, the number of reported

complications may seem small. The

researchers said, however, that the surveillance

system may miss many drug-related

complications.

This type of study cannot demonstrate a cause-

and-effect relationship between marijuana and

heart problems, but the findings underscore the

need for more research on this topic, experts

said.

"The study is very small and has many

limitations, but it is a warning sign," said Dr.

Suzanne Steinbaum, a cardiologist and the

director of Women's Heart Health of Lenox Hill

Hospital in New York.

"The perception is that marijuana is a magical

drug, that it's totally safe, and we can use it in

medical treatment. What we don't know about

are the negative effects, the potential harms,"

said Steinbaum, who is also an op-ed

contributor to Live Science.

Several previous reports have linked marijuana

use with serious heart problems. In one study

Involving nearly 4,000 patients, researchers

found that people's risk of heart attacks

increased five times in the first hour after

marijuana use. This five-fold increase in risk is a

little higher than the risk for sex, about the same

as that for intense exercise, and much less than

the risk caused by cocaine, which increases

one's chance of having a heart attack 25-fold,

the researchers told reporters last year.

Previous studies have also suggested marijuana use

could increase heart rateand blood pressure, and reduce

the blood's ability to carry oxygen, which may

contribute to the higher risk for heart attacks.

Altogether, the new findings and evidence from

previous studies suggest that, like any other

drug, marijuana has its own share of risks.

"There is clear clinical evidence to suggest a

therapeutic benefit of inhaled marijuana for the

management of a number of chronic,

debilitating conditions. However, clinical

evidence also suggests the potential for serious

cardiovascular risks associated with marijuana

use, including myocardial infarction, serious

cardiac arrhythmias, stroke and even death,"

Dr. Shereif Rezkalla, a cardiologist at the

Marshfield Clinic, in Marshfield, Wisc., wrote in

an editorial accompanying the new study.

Email Bahar Gholipour. Follow LiveScience @livescienceFacebook & Google+. Originally published on LiveScience



07/17/2018 00:24 AM


disabledke
Topic :   posttraumatic stress disorder

Image may contain: shoes

What are posttraumatic stress disorder triggers?

ANSWER

Certain triggers can set off your PTSD. They bring back strong memories. You may feel like you’re living through it all over again. Triggers can include sights, sounds, smells, or thoughts that remind you of the traumatic event in some way.

Some PTSD triggers are obvious, such as seeing a news report of an assault. Others are less clear. For example, if you were attacked on a sunny day, seeing a bright blue sky might make you upset.

Some posttraumatic stress disorder triggers are obvious. Others are subtle. In fact, you may not realize something is a trigger until you have a reaction.

Feeling as if you’re in danger is a sign that your PTSD has been triggered. A therapist can help you.

How long does it take for mental illness drugs to work?

ANSWER

Medications usually take 4-6 weeks to become fully effective. If one drug doesn't work, there are many others to try.

From: Drugs to Treat Mental Illness WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg onNovember 20, 2017

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL



07/16/2018 19:11 PM


disabledke
Topic :   Your Eyes & Iritis

Image may contain: shoes

Your Eyes and Iritis

Iritis Overview

The iris is a circular, pigmented membrane that provides the eyeits color and the opening in the center is the pupil of the eye.

The iris is made up of muscular fibers that control the amount of light entering the pupil so that you can see clearly. The iris accomplishes this task by making the pupil smaller in bright light and larger in dim light.

In some people, the iris can become inflamed. This is termed iritis.

Iritis Causes

Iritis may be a consequence of trauma (traumatic iritis) or nontraumatic causes:

In a large number of cases, no cause for iritis is found.

Iritis Symptoms

Iritis usually develops quickly and generally affects only one eye. Signs and symptoms may include any or all of the following:

  • Pain in the eye or brow region
  • Worsened eye pain when exposed to bright light
  • Reddened eye, especially adjacent to the iris
  • Small or funny shaped pupil
  • Blurred vision
  • Headache
CONTINUE READING BELOW

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When to Seek Medical Care for Iritis

Notify your eye doctor if any of the following signs or symptoms of iritis are present:

  • Eye pain, including pain associated with bright light
  • Blurred vision
  • Redness in the eye, especially near the iris

If you cannot reach your eye doctor, then seek medical attention at a hospital's emergency department.

Questions to Ask the Doctor About Iritis

If you've been diagnosed with iritis, these are questions you may want to ask your doctor:

  • Are there any signs of permanent damage to the eye?
  • Are there any signs of permanent vision loss?
  • What should I expect as my eye heals?
  • What symptoms should I call you about between visits?
  • Is my iritis just an eye problem or is it associated with another condition?

 

Iritis Exams and Tests

The diagnosis of iritis is confirmed by examining the eye with a slit lamp (a special microscope designed for eye exams). Your ophthalmologist can see cells (white blood cells) and flare (particles of protein) in the fluid that is produced in the eye.

Iritis Treatment at Home

Iritis requires prescription medications and follow-up visits with your eye doctor, so seeking medical care is very important.

  • Use prescription medications exactly as prescribed.
  • Wear dark glasses if light worsens your eye pain.
  • Take mild analgesics, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen(Advil), to help control some of the discomfort.

Medical Treatment of Iritis

Treatment of iritis includes the use of medication in the form of eye drops or pills to allow for healing and to help decrease eye pain.

Drugs to Treat Iritis

Treatment of iritis includes the use of a drug (in the form of eyedrops) to dilate (widen) the pupil and to prevent spasm of the iris muscles so that the inflamed iris can rest. This allows for healing and helps decrease the eye pain.

Steroid eyedrops are also prescribed unless an infectious agent (virus or bacteria) caused the iritis. Steroid eyedrops help decrease the inflammation of the iris. If the eye does not improve within a week, your eye doctor may consider prescribing steroid pills or steroid injections around the eye. The length of treatment depends on the severity of disease and how well the eye improves with the treatment.

Follow-Up Care for Iritis

In all cases of iritis, follow-up care with an eye care specialist is essential. In cases of nontraumatic iritis, your ophthalmologist will evaluate you for the presence of associated diseases.

Outlook for Iritis

Traumatic iritis usually goes away within one to two weeks. Nontraumatic iritis may take weeks, and occasionally months, to resolve.

Infectious cases of iritis will resolve once measures are taken to treat the infection.

Certain cases of iritis (those associated with systemic diseases, such as sarcoidosis or ankylosing spondylitis) may be chronic or recurrent.

Eye doctors may instruct certain people who are at high risk of having recurrent iritis to always have steroid eyedrops on hand so that they may begin using them at the first sign of a recurrence.



07/16/2018 18:24 PM


disabledke
Topic :   Cavernoma

Cavernoma

A cavernoma is a cluster of abnormal blood vessels, usually found in the brain and spinal cord.

They're sometimes known as cavernous angiomas, cavernous hemangiomas, or cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM).

A typical cavernoma looks like a raspberry. It's filled with blood that flows slowly through vessels that are like "caverns". A cavernoma can vary in size from a few millimetres to several centimetres across.

Symptoms of cavernoma

A cavernoma often doesn't cause symptoms, but when symptoms do occur they can include:

The severity and duration of symptoms can vary depending on the type of cavernoma and where it's located.

Problems can occur if the cavernoma bleeds or presses on certain areas of the brain. The cells lining a cavernoma are often thinner than those that line normal blood vessels, which means they're prone to leaking blood.

In most cases, bleeding is small – usually around half a teaspoonful of blood – and may not cause other symptoms. But severe haemorrhages can be life threatening and may lead to longlasting problems.

You should seek medical help as soon as possible if you experience any of the above symptoms for the first time.

What causes a cavernoma?

In most cases, there's no clear reason why a person develops a cavernoma. The condition can sometimes run in families – less than 50% of cases are thought to be genetic.

However, in most cases cavernomas occur randomly. Genetic testing can be carried out to determine whether a cavernoma is genetic or whether it's occurred randomly. 

Some cavernoma cases have also been linked to radiationexposure, such as previously having radiotherapy to the brain, usually as a child.

Who's affected?

It's estimated about 1 in every 600 people in the UK has a cavernoma that doesn't cause symptoms. 

Every year, around 1 person in every 400,000 in the UK is diagnosed with a cavernoma that has caused symptoms.

If symptoms do occur, most people will develop them by the time they reach their 30s.

Diagnosing cavernoma

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are mainly used to diagnose cavernomas. As symptoms aren't always evident, many people are only diagnosed with a cavernoma after having an MRI scan for another reason.

computerised tomography (CT) scan or angiography can also be used to diagnose cavernoma, but they're not as reliable as an MRI scan.

Monitoring your symptoms

Any symptoms you have may come and go as the cavernoma bleeds and then reabsorbs blood. It's important to closely monitor your symptoms, as any new symptoms might be a sign of a haemorrhage.

Your doctor can advise you about what to do if you experience any new or worsening symptoms. They may also recommend having a further brain scan.

MRI and CT scans can be used to detect bleeding on the brain, although they can't necessarily identify cavernomas that are at an increased risk of bleeding.

This is because the features of a cavernoma that can be seen on a brain scan, such as an increase in size, don't appear to be directly linked to the likelihood of bleeding.

Although cavernomas can get bigger, large cavernomas aren't any more likely to bleed than smaller ones.

What are the chances of a cavernoma bleeding?

The risk of having a haemorrhage varies from person to person, depending on whether you have experienced any bleeding before.

If you haven't had any bleeding before, it's estimated you have a less than 1% chance of experiencing a haemorrhage each year.

If your cavernoma has bled previously, your risk of having another haemorrhage is somewhere between 4% and 25% each year.

However, this risk decreases progressively over time if you don't experience any further bleeds, and eventually returns to the same level as that of people who haven't had any bleeding before.

Your level of risk will be one of the main factors taken into consideration when deciding if you would benefit from treatment.

Treating cavernoma

The recommended treatment for cavernoma will vary depending on an individual's circumstances and factors such as size, location and number.

Some cavernoma symptoms, such as headaches and seizures, can be controlled with medication.

However, more invasive treatment may sometimes be offered to reduce the risk of future haemorrhages. The decision to have such treatment is made on a case-by-case basis in discussion with your doctor.

Types of treatment offered in the UK to reduce the risk of haemorrhages include:

  • neurosurgery – carried out under general anaesthetic to remove the cavernoma
  • stereotactic radiosurgery – where a single, concentrated dose of radiation is aimed directly at the cavernoma, causing it to become thickened and scarred

In most cases, neurosurgery is preferred to stereotactic radiosurgery because the effectiveness of radiosurgery in preventing haemorrhages is unknown.

Stereotactic radiosurgery is usually only considered if the position of the cavernoma makes neurosurgery too difficult or dangerous. 

Risks of invasive treatment include stroke and death, although the exact risks depend on the location of the cavernoma. You should discuss the possible risks of treatment with your doctor beforehand.

Further information

International research programmes are trying to find out more about what causes cavernoma and how these defective blood vessels are formed. The long-term outlook for people with cavernomas is also being investigated.

The Cavernoma Alliance UK website has more information about the condition.

Page last reviewed: 28/03/2016 
Next review due: 31/10/2018



07/16/2018 17:58 PM


disabledke
Topic :   Betahistine

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Betahistine is belongs to a group of medications used to treat vertigo associated with Ménière's disease. Vertigo is a condition that causes sufferers to have a sensation of rotation or movement of themselves or their surroundings. Ménière's disease is a disorder of the inner ear that causes vertigo in addition to symptoms such as ringing in the ears, headache, and loss of hearing.

Betahistine is used to reduce the number of episodes of vertigo associated with Ménière's disease. It is believed to work by decreasing the pressure in the ear. This pressure is believed to contribute to the sense of dizziness, nausea, and ringing in the ears and hearing loss that people with Ménière's disease experience.

This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.

Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

16 mg
Each round, biconvex, scored, white to almost white tablet with bevelled edges, engraved with "N" on one side and "267" on the scored side, contains betahistine 16 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose, and sodium stearyl fumarate.

24 mg
Each round, biconvex, scored, white to almost white tablet with bevelled edges, engraved with "N" on one side and "24" on the scored side, contains betahistine 24 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: mannitol, microcrystalline cellulose, and sodium stearyl fumarate.

How should I use this medication?

The usual recommended dose of betahistine for adults is 24 mg to 48 mg given in 2 or 3 divided doses (i.e., 12 mg to 24 mg twice a day, or 8 mg to 16 mg three times a day). To prevent stomach upset, it is recommended that this medication be taken with food.

Many things can affect the dose of a medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here,do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, and keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take betahistine if you:

  • are allergic to betahistine or any ingredients of the medication
  • have a peptic (stomach) ulcer or a history of peptic ulcer
  • have a condition known as pheochromocytoma

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

 The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • bloating
  • headache
  • heartburn or indigestion
  • nausea
  • vomiting

Although most of these side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not check with your doctor or seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • itching
  • rash
  • stomach pain

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • signs of a serious allergic reaction (e.g., swelling of face or throat, hives, or difficulty breathing)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed.Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Asthma: This medication may make the symptoms of breathing problems worse. If you have asthma, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Liver function: Liver disease or reduced liver function may cause this medication to build up in the body, causing side effects. If you have liver problems, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Stomach ulcers: Taking betahistine has been linked to an increase in the symptoms of stomach ulcers. If you have a history of stomach ulcers, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if betahistine passes into breast milk. If you are a breast-feeding mother and are taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of using this medication have not been established for children.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

There may be an interaction between betahistine and any of the following:

  • antihistamines (e.g., diphenhydramine, cetirizine, chlorpheniramine)
  • beta-2 agonists (e.g., salbutamol, salmeterol, fenoterol, formoterol)
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs; e.g., moclobemide, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine)

If you are taking any of these medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Medications other than those listed above may interact with this medication. Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2018. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Teva-Betahistine



07/16/2018 16:15 PM


disabledke
Re :   NHS Hospitals

Well to me that's sounds like a tia or even maybe a stroke. Did your MRI scan show any blood clots? Just because you don't have a bleed on the brain does not mean you've not had a tia or a stroke. My mum had a tia which was so very mild nothing showed up on the MRI/ct scan. All mum had was a weakness from her left elbow to her hand and a slight tingle in her top lip. No speech problem. Took my mum to the stroke unit to have tests done after the doctor came to see my mum. All was clear and we were told mum had a slight tia. I watched her like hawk for 30 + days as new the risk. I was her carer too. Roll on 8 weeks and mum had a stroke at home. Unfortunately I was away on a carers break but spoke to mum that morning and the warden checked on mum. It took my mum 20 minutes to press her call alarm pendant. Apparently call went through and response was unknown but got a first responder to our home. In the mean time I had a call to tell me mum was not well and I was 30 minutes away. I walked in on mum in the stroke state. What a shock! It took mums hole right side. Couldn't feel anything and barely talk. In the meantime the first responder called for an ambulance which took 30 minutes. Our hospital is 5 minutes away. They came got mum out of our home and into the ambulance. As far as I'm aware the RED phone was called to tell the hospital to be on standby for a stroke patient. I am now told there was a delay in getting my mum to resus due to hand over or something. This resulted in more time being wasted. Fast forward. I arrived was told mum had a clot and needed a clot busting drug. It took them nearly 4 HOURS to give the drug to mum. They blame her warfarin due to a heart condition called AF as her warfarin levels had to be tested or a bleed could happen. Fair enough. These bloods should have been rushed through. Mum was eventually given the drug at nearly 12am and the clock was set for 15 minute obs. I went home only to be called in at 2am saying mum is very poorly. I arrived to be told my mum was ASLEEP by a nurse. So I went home only to be called at 8.20am asking how quickly I could get to the hospital. I went in and got put in the relieves room. A doctor comes in and tells me mum has had another stroke and she is going to die and walked out. Turns out 15 minutes after I left mum became unresponsive and not asleep. My mum passed away 4 days later. I blame them for messing about and causing my mum to die. Sorry long post.


07/16/2018 05:36 AM


disabledke
Re :   NHS Hospitals

I was admitted to Fairfield General Hospital Stroke A & E Department on 14th July 1018 at approx 10.30am with a TIA, I started having a seizure at 9.20am I felt in a daze with both arms & legs violently shaking about as well as my head, I also felt a burning sensation in the top back section of my head as well as left front side of my head also shaking from side to side, after 10 minutes I telephoned an ambulance I said just “Ambulance” Stroke” as I wanted to say more but could only get 2 words out to explain, she said address please I very slowly said, Rose…wood Crescent, ...Chadderton, then strudeled any thing strudel to say more so she stayed on line & asked me to try & say what’s going on after a period managed to tell her about the symptoms I was having, when the ambulance crew turned up they asked what went on I eventually told them, the checked my heart & was OK discovered I had low oxygen level so put me on oxygen bu noise through asthma, then took me by stretcher in ambulance to Fairfield General Hospital the stroke doctor said we will give you a head MRI Scan so did when I had it still struggling to get any words out I said have “I stroke” he said no I just said “TIA” he said no neurological so sending you to see neurologist so I went still struggling to speak, to Dr Kurpo (spelling), he said “you have not had a TIA mmmm how can I explain this” he said “your brain runs like a computer but the brain more advanced then the computer & like a computer the brain crashes so your brain when you have a lot of stress & a lot going on in your life, that is what happened to you so we admit for observation over night then see you in the morning“, I just said very slowly & strudel said “but I have symptoms of TIA” he said “I don’t think so” smiling, I said “no you wrong” he said “I don’t think so Mr Fletcher I will now send you upstairs to rest & recover.”
He said “because a brain MRI Scan was not showing bleeding” he said “you could not have had a TIA!” I thought well a TIA often does not show up in MRI Scan & he should know that so why is he dismissing it? It upset me that a long standing Neurologist that I have known since 1994 when I had my first Major Stroke, then strokes & TIA‘s following the Major Stroke? Why was my records not checked when he was the one that wrote them all? 
I have a stroke condition which has never been named, which I would like to know what it is called.
I had by 5pm fully recovered as chatted to the nurses & patient at side of me we even managed a laugh even though we where ill in health.

I discovered that Ward 5b was struggling to run it effetely because they had only half the staff that they needed the poor nurses was having to run from section to section of this large ward of stroke victims, which was making the patients anxious and upset, the nurses did the best they could but was run off there feet & unable to carry out all there duties to a professional standard and all patients suffered as result.

I only managed 3 hours sleep as was refused any medication in case of brain bleed so why say that when consultant said it was not TIA?

I saw a Dr AA Ansari a very nice professional consultant in the morning of Saturday 15th July 2018, who speciality general medicine arrange my medication. Unfortunately the hospital only had half so had to wait for most medication till I got home.

In general I felt so sorry for the poor nurses that was doing a very professional job but could not carry out all there duties through being very short staff as head staff nurse told me so, I told her you doing a great job besides that well done, the next patient agreed with me.

I also felt sorry for all these poor patients that are not getting the proper care that they are desperately needing, something need to be done in our NHS Hospitals as similar in other hospitals around the country, please let me know any bad experiences that you have faced present or past, thanks so much Kenny Fletcher!

https://www.change.org/p/simon-stevens-chief-executive-nhs-



07/16/2018 05:29 AM


disabledke
Re :   NHS Hospitals

Yes I agree. I was recently in hospital for 3 months and got sepsis 3 times and c diff once. On various times the ward was short staffed and the nurses were being offered £32 an hour to come in on a bank shift. When I was in it was with a bowel problembut in my last few weeks I had what I would describe as seizures. It would start by my left hand side going tingling and pins and needles and then I couldn't move my left side then my speach would go and then I blacked out. When I came to I still had trouble moving my left side e.g. Couldn't hold a glass of water for a long time. I was in a side room so it was difficult for others to see it happening and I couldn't press my nurse call bell cause I couldn't move my left side and I'm a right arm amputee. Luckily on 1 occasion an experienced nurse was in giving me my night medication and this happened and so he saw it from start to finish. He had to press the emergency alarm. I was told I would be seen by a neurologist but in the meantime they done scans and ruled out a stroke. When I was well enough I done my own research on the internet and a big study in America reported that people that had had sepsis especially if you are under 65 are at a much greater risk of developing epilepsy. I certainly had the symptoms. When I saw the neurologist he didn't seem interested at all. His phone went 3 times when he was with me and he answered it on all occasions. He hardly spent any time with me. He said that because these episodes were only happening as I was falling asleep or just woken up from sleep he said he didn't think it was epilepsy as I would have these episodes at other times too. But online it said that a third of people have these attacks when they are falling asleep or just waking up. It even said online that you should have an EEG and it said that they might ask you to be sleep deprived the night before you have it by only sleeping about 3 hours as they hoped that you might go to sleep during the EEG as this is when you are most likely to have a seizure. I never got an EEG and never saw the neurologist again. Luckily since I came home I've not had anymore of these episodes but I'm sleeping much more. So I guess I will never know unless I do have another 1 of these episodes. Totally no confidence in the neurologist I saw.


07/16/2018 05:11 AM


disabledke
Topic :   NHS Hospitals



Image may contain: shoes

I was admitted to Fairfield General Hospital Stroke A & E Department on 14th July 1018 at approx 10.30am with a TIA, I  started having a seizure at 9.20am I felt in a daze with both arms & legs violently shaking about as well as my head, I also felt a burning sensation in the top back section of my head as well as left front side of my head also shaking from side to side, after 10 minutes I telephoned an ambulance I said just “Ambulance” Stroke” as I wanted to say more but could only get 2 words out to explain, she said address please I very slowly said, Rose…wood  Crescent, ...Chadderton, then strudeled any thing strudel to say more so she stayed on line & asked me to try & say what’s going on after a period managed to tell her about the symptoms I was having, when the ambulance crew turned up they asked what went on I eventually told them, the checked my heart & was OK discovered I had low oxygen level so put me on oxygen bu noise through asthma, then took me by stretcher in ambulance to Fairfield General Hospital the stroke doctor said we will give you a head MRI Scan so did when I had it still struggling to get any words out I said have “I stroke”  he said no I just said “TIA” he said no neurological so sending you to see neurologist so I went still struggling to speak, to Dr Kurpo (spelling), he said “you have not had a TIA mmmm how can I explain this” he said “your brain runs like a computer but the brain more advanced then the computer & like a computer the brain crashes so your brain when you have a lot of stress & a lot going on in your life, that is what happened to you so we admit for observation over night then see you in the morning“, I just said very slowly & strudel said “but I have symptoms of TIA” he said “I don’t think so” smiling, I said “no you wrong” he said “I don’t think so Mr Fletcher I will now send you upstairs to rest & recover.”

He said “because a brain MRI Scan was not showing bleeding” he said “you could not have had a TIA!” I thought well a TIA often does not show up in MRI Scan & he should know that so why is he dismissing it? It upset me that a long standing Neurologist that I have known since 1994 when I had my first Major Stroke, then strokes & TIA‘s following the Major Stroke? Why was my records not checked when he was the one that wrote them all? 

I have a stroke condition which has never been named, which I would like to know what it is called.

I had by 5pm fully recovered as chatted to the nurses & patient at side of me we even managed a laugh even though we where ill in health.


I discovered that Ward 5b was struggling to run it effetely because they had only half the staff that they needed the poor nurses was having to run from section to section of this large ward of stroke victims, which was making the patients anxious and upset, the nurses did the best they could but was run off there feet & unable to carry out all there duties to a professional standard and all patients suffered as result.


I only managed 3 hours sleep as was refused any medication in case of brain bleed so why say that when consultant said it was not TIA?


I saw a Dr AA Ansari a very nice professional consultant in the morning of Saturday 15th July 2018, who speciality general medicine arrange my medication. Unfortunately the hospital only had half so had to wait for most medication till I got home.


In general I felt so sorry for the poor nurses that was doing a very professional job but could not carry out all there duties through being very short staff as head staff nurse told me so, I told her you doing a great job besides that well done, the next patient agreed with me.


I also felt sorry for all these poor patients that are not getting the proper care that they are desperately needing, something need to be done in our NHS Hospitals as similar in other hospitals around the country, please let me know any bad experiences that you have faced present or past. 

I am going to campaign to get the NHS services, including social services, etc, so the more information I can get the better chance of us making changes to the NHS in England!



 

Please do not remove credits.  This webset page was assembled on Saturday August 8, 2009 by Teddie with graphics from © 2009 Riverdeep Interactive Learn. using one of the many auto-scripters available at Chat_Central_Gateway  All rights reserved KENDOC 2005-9







07/15/2018 18:57 PM


disabledke
Topic :   NHS Hospitals



Image may contain: shoes

I was admitted to Fairfield General Hospital Stroke A & E Department on 14th July 1018 at approx 10.30am with a TIA, I  started having a seizure at 9.20am I felt in a daze with both arms & legs violently shaking about as well as my head, I also felt a burning sensation in the top back section of my head as well as left front side of my head also shaking from side to side, after 10 minutes I telephoned an ambulance I said just “Ambulance” Stroke” as I wanted to say more but could only get 2 words out to explain, she said address please I very slowly said, Rose…wood  Crescent, ...Chadderton, then strudeled any thing strudel to say more so she stayed on line & asked me to try & say what’s going on after a period managed to tell her about the symptoms I was having, when the ambulance crew turned up they asked what went on I eventually told them, the checked my heart & was OK discovered I had low oxygen level so put me on oxygen bu noise through asthma, then took me by stretcher in ambulance to Fairfield General Hospital the stroke doctor said we will give you a head MRI Scan so did when I had it still struggling to get any words out I said have “I stroke”  he said no I just said “TIA” he said no neurological so sending you to see neurologist so I went still struggling to speak, to Dr Kurpo (spelling), he said “you have not had a TIA mmmm how can I explain this” he said “your brain runs like a computer but the brain more advanced then the computer & like a computer the brain crashes so your brain when you have a lot of stress & a lot going on in your life, that is what happened to you so we admit for observation over night then see you in the morning“, I just said very slowly & strudel said “but I have symptoms of TIA” he said “I don’t think so” smiling, I said “no you wrong” he said “I don’t think so Mr Fletcher I will now send you upstairs to rest & recover.”

He said “because a brain MRI Scan was not showing bleeding” he said “you could not have had a TIA!” I thought well a TIA often does not show up in MRI Scan & he should know that so why is he dismissing it? It upset me that a long standing Neurologist that I have known since 1994 when I had my first Major Stroke, then strokes & TIA‘s following the Major Stroke? Why was my records not checked when he was the one that wrote them all? 

I have a stroke condition which has never been named, which I would like to know what it is called.

I had by 5pm fully recovered as chatted to the nurses & patient at side of me we even managed a laugh even though we where ill in health.


I discovered that Ward 5b was struggling to run it effetely because they had only half the staff that they needed the poor nurses was having to run from section to section of this large ward of stroke victims, which was making the patients anxious and upset, the nurses did the best they could but was run off there feet & unable to carry out all there duties to a professional standard and all patients suffered as result.


I only managed 3 hours sleep as was refused any medication in case of brain bleed so why say that when consultant said it was not TIA?


I saw a Dr AA Ansari a very nice professional consultant in the morning of Saturday 15th July 2018, who speciality general medicine arrange my medication. Unfortunately the hospital only had half so had to wait for most medication till I got home.


In general I felt so sorry for the poor nurses that was doing a very professional job but could not carry out all there duties through being very short staff as head staff nurse told me so, I told her you doing a great job besides that well done, the next patient agreed with me.


I also felt sorry for all these poor patients that are not getting the proper care that they are desperately needing, something need to be done in our NHS Hospitals as similar in other hospitals around the country, please let me know any bad experiences that you have faced present or past. 

I am going to campaign to get the NHS services, including social services, etc, so the more information I can get the better chance of us making changes to the NHS in England!



 

Please do not remove credits.  This webset page was assembled on Saturday August 8, 2009 by Teddie with graphics from © 2009 Riverdeep Interactive Learn. using one of the many auto-scripters available at Chat_Central_Gateway  All rights reserved KENDOC 2005-9







07/15/2018 18:56 PM


disabledke
Topic :   Age Concern

Information and advice enquiry

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If your enquiry is about something else, such as volunteering or Age UK products, please return to the main menu and choose the option which best describes what you’re looking for.

Fill in this form and we'll get back to you as quickly as possible. Please note that we can't contact third parties at your request, so please provide only your own contact details.




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07/13/2018 09:58 AM


disabledke
Topic :   Lyme Disease MSIDS

Lyme Disease MSIDS

Why call it Lyme Disease MSIDS?

Will the new MSIDS or multiple systemic infectious disease syndrome catch on as a more comprehensive name? We don't know but we like it. Here's why...

Dr. Richard Horowitz refers to the phenomenon most know as Lyme disease as multiple systemic infectious disease syndrome (MSIDS).

Lyme Disease MSIDS

We think this is more appropriate because few people have only Lyme disease and not the co-infections. One survey found that 50% of those looked at had 2 or more infections. The multiple infections cause numerous symptoms that for any other than Lyme literate practitioners, defy diagnosis.

Once in the human body, the various bacteria suppress the immune system and stimulate a body wide inflammatory cascade. The effects on those infected include attacks on multiple organs and systems in the body, including the skin, brain and nervous tissue, the most notable being the heart and brain.

When you hear Lyme Disease, did the thought of a tick bite come to mind? Lyme disease has grown up and is so much more than just the result of a tick bite. It is now believed to be transmitted by mosquitoes and other vectors.

Lyme Disease is a term that encompasses several potential infections and numerous symptoms. Currently, many common diseases and conditions are considered misdiagnosed Lyme Disease. This is just one reason why Lyme Disease MSIDS or just MSIDS is more appropriate.

When it comes to the Lyme disease diagnosis, Lyme disease prognosis and Lyme disease stages, it is difficult to look at more than one infectious process at a time. There may be two or even several infections each causing different symptoms. Each infection may cause or result in various symptoms, many differing from the others and differing in the people infected. All this happen at the same time.

Further complicating treatment, one treatment that proves effective for one of the bacteria may actually benefit or help another bacteria.

Water Cures and Lyme MSIDS

Two of our first people with Lyme had multiple organisms in their blood. One, our founder announced he had Lyme early in 2016 on his radio show. The second person we coached was found to have spirochetes with heads at each end (strong possibility of being Lyme but showed up negative on a rapid Lyme test). Also there were the symptoms and the bacteria found in the live blood that suggested Babesia infection. Finally, there were gram negative rods present and spirochetes with no heads. So a total of 4 different bacteria were found in the blood.

What Are The Multiples in MSIDS?

Of the Lyme borrelia tick, there are over 20 species around the world, 7 of them are in the US. Five of the species in the US carry Lyme disease (B. burgdorferi (Bb), B. americana, B. andersonii, B. bissettii, B. mayonii in the Midwest.) The problem, many of these ticks carry more than one infectious bacteria.

The Black-legged Ixodes scapularis tick can carry infectious bacteria's such as Anaplasma, Bartonella, Ehrlichia, and Babesia that cause anaplasmosis, babesiosis and Lineage 2 Powassan disease. (Lineage 1 ticks don't like and rarely come in contact with humans, 10-15% of those who get Linage 2 die).

Not All Spirochetes Are Lyme: There are six oral spirochetes that can infect our blood and cause havoc with our lives. In all, there are at a minimum of 20 spirochetes alone that can infect us and not all are Lyme related.

At Water Cures, based on our research, we believe that Lyme Disease may also be a misdiagnoses for some of these non-Lyme different spirochete infections. Spirochetes are the cork screw shaped bacteria that cause Lyme and a close cousin that causes syphilis. Additionally, there are the various co-infections that can come with both Lyme infection (Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete) as well as the other spirochete infections.

There are currently at least 20 known spirochetes that can invade us and eventually get into our brain or any other tissue of our body. Six are dental related spirochetes. When they get inside you, they bring their friends with them. These include cocci and gram negative rods. Unlike most bacteria, the infections do not cause a septic response. They grow very slowly. Also, they have a stealth component to promote their existence.

Of the common tick-borne Lyme co-infections in the United States, there are Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis, Relapsing fever, Tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and Babesiosis.

As to the Lyme spirochetes and the 19 distant cousins, there are spirochetes that look like they have dumbbell ends (most likely Lyme) and the ones without.

Lyme, MSIDS and Antibiotics

Evidence seems to indicate antibiotics currently will not kill them off unless given immediately after exposure, when first infected. While antibiotic have been given such favorable reviews in the minds of people, the evidence found in the NNT or numbers needed to treat and the NNH or numbers needed to harm tell a far different story. According to the evidence, many times, antibiotics simply do more harm than good. To research this, research the NNT for the various antibiotics.

Of course there are advantages for many with antibiotics. For some, simply your belief may provide you with the placebo effect benefit. Likewise, if you don't believe in them, you are more likely to experience a nocebo effect or worse, any of the many negative side effects reported that result from antibiotic use.

There is much debate on the use of antibiotics. There are two schools on the use...one for short term and one believing in the necessity of long term antibiotics.

The doctors who prescribe for long term are called Lyme literate doctors. The others are called Lyme Illiterate.

This is not to suggest you should not use antibiotics. However, when they simply do not work, even after several months, you should be aware that there are numerous natural antibiotics that work. While it is not a quick fix and it too may take several months, we are having success in killing off enough bacteria so that people are getting their lives back.

It is estimated that the average person spends close to $100,000 before they get a diagnosis and start the healing process.

Alternatives

The Water Cures: Lyme Disease Booklet is a guide to the various treatments that we have found works in those we coach. One unique feature of MSIDS is that just as the various symptoms are different, so to the pathway to healing is different.

For instance, you may start on mega-dose vitamin C to find that you are one of the rare ones that gets gout or pseudo-gout. A treatment option like eating a raw diet may not work because of malabsorption issues, also caused by the MSIDS. So, to treat the pseudo-gout, you will learn about magnesium bicarbonate concentrate you can make and add to your water yourself.

Or you may have cold hands and feet. While this is commonly thought to be caused by the thyroid, it is more likely to be caused by the pancreas. Thus, a dose of ginger tea 2-3 times a day will make the cold hands go away. This and more, much more can be found in our new guide.

There is interesting research on the use of frequencies to kill bacteria. Research was conducted at Swathmore College where they produced a TED Talk video providing evidence that frequencies could indeed destroy bacteria without harming living cells. While the actual machines on the market are not the same (unless their price is in the $4500 range), this is an interesting possibility.

Lyme Disease Definition

Lyme Disease Answers

Lyme Disease Stages

Symptoms of Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease Treatment

Lyme Disease and Hydration

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Go to the Well



07/12/2018 07:48 AM


disabledke
Topic :   questionnaire Lyme Disease or Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS)

Grab a piece of paper and a pen and take this questionnaire developed by Richard Horowitz, MD, to help you determine if you might have Lyme Disease or Multiple Systemic Infectious Disease Syndrome (MSIDS).

Section 1: Symptom Frequency Score

0 None
1 Mild
2 Moderate
3 Severe

  1. Unexplained fevers, sweats, chills, or flushing
  2. Unexplained weight change; loss or gain
  3. Fatigue, tiredness
  4. Unexplained hair loss
  5. Swollen glands
  6. Sore throat
  7. Testicular or pelvic pain
  8. Unexplained menstrual irregularity
  9. Unexplained breast milk production; breast pain
  10. Irritable bladder or bladder dysfunction
  11. Sexual dysfunction or loss of libido
  12. Upset stomach
  13. Change in bowel function (constipation or diarrhea)
  14. Chest pain or rib soreness
  15. Shortness of breath or cough
  16. Heart palpitations, pulse skips, heart block
  17. History of a heart murmur or valve prolapse
  18. Joint pain or swelling
  19. Stiffness of the neck or back
  20. Muscle pain or cramps
  21. Twitching of the face or other muscles
  22. Headaches
  23. Neck cracks or neck stiffness
  24. Tingling, numbness, burning, or stabbing sensations
  25. Facial paralysis (Bell’s palsy)
  26. Eyes/vision: double, blurry
  27. Ears/hearing: buzzing, ringing, ear pain
  28. Increased motion sickness, vertigo
  29. Light-headedness, poor balance, difficulty walking
  30. Tremors
  31. Confusion, difficulty thinking
  32. Difficulty with concentration or reading
  33. Forgetfulness, poor short-term memory
  34. Disorientation: getting lost; going to wrong places
  35. Difficulty with speech or writing
  36. Mood swings, irritability, depression
  37. Disturbed sleep: too much, too little, early awakening
  38. Exaggerated symptoms or worse hangover from alcohol

Section 1 Total:

Section 2: Most Common Symptoms
If you rated a 3 for each of the following in Section 1, give yourself 5 additional points:

  1. Fatigue
  2. Forgetfulness, poor short-term memory
  3. Joint pain or swelling
  4. Tingling, numbness, burning, or stabbing sensations
  5. Disturbed sleep: too much, too little, early awakening

Section 2 Total:

Section 3: Lyme Incidence Score
Now please circle the points for each of the following statements you can agree with:

  1. You have had a tick bite with no rash or flulike symptoms. 3 points
  2. You have had a tick bite, an erythema migrans, or an undefined rash, followed by flulike symptoms. 5 points
  3. You live in what is considered a Lyme-endemic area. 2 points
  4. You have a family member who has been diagnosed with Lyme and/or other tick-borne infections. 1 point
  5. You experience migratory muscle pain. 4 points
  6. You experience migratory joint pain. 4 points
  7. You experience tingling/burning/numbness that migrates and/or comes and goes. 4 points
  8. You have received a prior diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. 3 points
  9. You have received a prior diagnosis of a specific autoimmune disorder (lupus, MS, or rheumatoid arthritis), or of a nonspecific autoimmune disorder. 3 points
  10. You have had a positive Lyme test (IFA, ELISA, Western blot, PCR, and/or borrelia culture). 5 points

Section 3 Total:

Section 4: Overall Health Score
 

  1. Thinking about your overall physical health, for how many of the past 30 days was your physical health not good?________ days

Award yourself the following points based on the total number of days:

0-5 days = 1 point
6-12 days = 2 points
13-20 days = 3 points
21–30 days = 4 points

55. Thinking about your overall mental health, for how many days during the past 30 days was your mental health not good?________ days

0–5 days = 1 point
6–12 days = 2 points
13–20 days = 3 points
21–30 days = 4 points

Section 4 Total:

Section 5: Scoring
Record your total scores for each section below and add them together to achieve your final score:

Section 1 Total:
Section 2 Total:
Section 3 Total:
Section 4 Total:

Final Score:

Section 6: Data Interpretation
If you scored 46 or more, you have a high probability of a tick-borne disorder and should see a health-care provider for further evaluation.

If you scored between 21 and 45, you possibly have a tick-borne disorder and should see a health-care provider for further evaluation.

If you scored under 21, you are not likely to have a tick-borne disorder.

Interpreting the Results
We see a high frequency of Section 1 symptoms in our patients, including fatigue, joint and muscle pain that often migrates, sleep disorders, as well as memory and concentration problems, and a high frequency of Section 3 symptoms, especially neuropathic pain that comes and goes and migrates (tingling, numbness, burning, etc.). These form a cluster of presenting symptoms that are characteristic of those with a high probability of having Lyme-MSIDS.

*The Horowitz Lyme-MSIDS Questionnaire is not intended to replace the advice of your own physician or other medical professional. You should consult a medical professional in matters relating to health, and individuals are solely responsible for their own health care decisions regarding the use of this questionnaire. It is intended for informational purposes only and not for self-treatment or diagnosis.

© Richard Horowitz. Used with permission.



07/12/2018 07:41 AM


disabledke
Topic :   Osteopathy

osteopathy

[os-tee-op-uh-thee]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. therapeutic system originally based upon the premise that manipulation of the muscles and bones topromote structural integrity could restore or preserve health: current osteopathic physicians use thediagnostic and therapeutic techniques of conventional medicine as well as manipulative measures


07/12/2018 05:18 AM


disabledke
Re :   Type 2 Diabetes

Overview

We are investigating the effectiveness of taking a new oral medication alongside existing diabetic kidney disease treatments. The aim of the study is to evaluate how effective the combination is in better managing kidney disease and reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke (which are more common in people with this disease).

Who are Synexus?
As one of the largest and most recognised clinical study organisation in the world, Synexus provide a friendly relaxed environment where you have the opportunity to help yourself and others. Millions of people lack the treatment they need to manage their conditions. Those people rely on volunteers like you, and researches like us to find answers.

Age
Gender
Condition
Ref
18+
Male and Female
Type 2 Diabetes
Figaro

How do I benefit as a Synexus patient?
You will be assessed and treated by our highly trained doctors and nurses and You’re offered specialist advice and support throughout the study. You won’t be asked to pay for anything and any reasonable travel expenses will be reimbursed. As a Synexus patient you will be contributing to the future of medicine.



07/11/2018 14:21 PM


disabledke
Re :   Type 2 Diabetes

Overview

Do you have type 2 diabetes? Are you concerned about your heart risk?

We are currently looking for volunteers to take part in the PROMINENT study. This is a study for people with type 2 diabetes and elevated triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood).

Although many people take medications to lower their cholesterol, they remain at risk of developing serious heart problems.

This study is researching a potential new medication to find out if it can prevent heart attacks and other heart-related problems by lowering triglycerides and raising the amount of ‘good’ cholesterol (known as HDL).



07/11/2018 14:19 PM

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